Planet Chromium

August 29, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to 37.0.2062.119 (Platform version: 5978.80.0/5978.81.0) for all Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. A list of changes can be found here.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Josafat Garcia
Google Chrome

by Josafat (noreply@blogger.com) at August 29, 2014 05:07 PM

August 28, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update

The dev channel has been updated to 39.0.2138.3 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

A full list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at August 28, 2014 06:31 PM

Beta Update

The Chrome Team is delighted to announce the promotion of Chrome 38 to the beta channel with 38.0.2125.24 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

This release contains many stability and developer improvements including:
  • New experimental user switching design which makes changing profiles and into incognito mode simpler.
  • A new experimental Guest mode.
  • Experimental UI for Chrome supervised users.
  • Lots of under the hood changes for stability and performance.

Find out more at the Chromium blog.  A full list of changes in this build is available in the Git log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.


Matthew Yuan
Google Chrome

by matthewyuan@chromium.org (noreply@blogger.com) at August 28, 2014 06:23 PM

Chromium Blog

Chrome 38 Beta: New primitives for the next-generation web

Today’s Chrome Beta channel release includes a ton of new primitives and APIs to simplify development and give developers more control over their web applications. Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to Chrome for Android, Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome OS.

New HTML element: <picture>

This release adds support for the new <picture> element thanks to the hard work of community contributor Yoav Weiss, who was able to dedicate his time to implementing this feature in multiple rendering engines because of a successful crowdfunding campaign that raised more than 50% of its funding goal.

The <picture> element takes the concept of responsive design, previously solved by sending duplicate resources to the client, and bakes an elegant solution right into the web platform. It allows developers to list multiple versions of images that may be appropriate for the browser to display based on screen size, pixel density, or other factors.

<picture>
    <source media="(min-width: 45em)" srcset="large.jpg">
    <source media="(min-width: 32em)" srcset="med.jpg">
    <img src="small.jpg" alt="The president giving an award.">
</picture>


New JavaScript features

Chrome 38 also enables by default several new JavaScript language features from the draft ECMAScript 6 (ES6) specification. Additions include:
  • Maps and sets, two highly-requested data structures which make storing and interacting with data simpler and more rational.
  • Iterators now provide an easy and extensible way to iterate over sequenced data types such as arrays and strings, as well as the new maps and sets.
  • Symbols, which help prevent object properties from unintentionally interfering with each other.
  • Math functions such as Math.sign and Math.log10, which prevents developers from having to re-implement these functions and provides the performance boost of built-in functions. Take a look at the full list of new functions.
Future releases of Chrome will contain even more ES6 features as the specification matures. Stay posted!

Other updates in this release
  • The Network Information ("NetInfo") API is now enabled, giving web applications access to the current type of network on a device running Android, iOS, or Chrome OS. This could allow an app to only do data-intensive activities such as syncing when connected to a Wi-Fi connection.
  • The addition of the Screen Orientation API allows developers to not only detect whether a device is in portrait or landscape mode, but also lock the screen orientation while a user is within that app.
  • The CSS value "image-rendering: pixelated" is now supported, which allows scaled images to appear to be composed of very large pixels. Example use cases include high-performance display of zoomed photos in image editing software without large bandwidth or load time costs.
  • The Encoding API enables the encoding and decoding of data from binary streams, such as converting between a raw ArrayBuffer and a string.
  • The new File interface allows developers to create and interact with File objects in the same way as Blob objects.
As always, visit chromestatus.com/features for a complete overview of Chrome’s developer features, and circle +Google Chrome Developers for more frequent updates!

Posted by Andreas Rossberg, Senior Symbolic Software Engineer

by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at August 28, 2014 06:20 PM

Google Chrome Releases

Chrome Beta for Android Update

Chrome Beta for Android has been updated to 37.0.2062.117 and will be available in Google Play over the next few days. This release fixes various stability and performance bugs, and issues with the UI. A partial list of changes in this build is available in the Git revision log. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. More information about Chrome for Android is available on the Chrome site.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome

by Jason Kersey (noreply@blogger.com) at August 28, 2014 05:58 PM

Chromium Blog

Mac Chrome: When I’m Sixty-Four (Bits)

On the heels of Tuesday’s release of 64-bit Chrome for Windows, all Mac Chrome users on the beta channel will be updated to a new 64-bit version of Chrome 38. Previously, Chrome was a 32-bit app on Macs. While doubling the number of bits won’t make things twice as good, it does allow us to make a number of speed and security improvements.

64-bit Chrome has become faster as a result of having access to a superior instruction set, more registers, and a more efficient function calling convention. Improved opportunities for ASLR enhance this version’s security. Another major benefit of this change comes from the fact that most programs on a modern Mac are already 64-bit apps. In cases where Chrome was the last remaining 32-bit app, there were launch-time and memory-footprint penalties as 32-bit copies of all of the system libraries needed to be loaded to support Chrome. Now that Chrome’s a 64-bit app too, we expect you’ll find that it launches more quickly and that overall system memory use decreases.

Because of this change, Chrome for Mac will no longer support 32-bit NPAPI plugins, although their 64-bit counterparts are supported. Users shouldn’t notice any changes, because most major plugins are available in both 32-bit and 64-bit form, and many major websites have been switching from NPAPI towards more modern HTML5 APIs. This is also a good time to remind everyone that NPAPI support will be removed from Chrome later this year.

Nearly every Mac user has a computer capable of running this 64-bit version, so we’re automatically updating all Mac Chrome beta channel users. Those few users with first-generation Intel Macs will miss out on the fun, but as we bid them farewell, we’ll remind them that they’ll still be able to run the latest version on the stable channel, Chrome 37.

You can check to see if the Chrome you’re running is a 64-bit version by checking Chrome’s About page (chrome://help) and looking next to the version number. If it says “64-bit” there, that’s a sure sign that you’re running one of these new builds. We hope that this is the only visible difference that you’ll find between the old 32-bit and new 64-bit versions, but in case you find anything amiss during the beta period, please let us know.

Posted by Mark Mentovai, Software Engineer and Register Doubler

by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at August 28, 2014 05:00 PM

Google Chrome Blog

This time it's personal

Anyone who’s argued over the TV remote knows that sharing a living room doesn’t mean you want to share everything else. The same is true on the web. So in the latest Chrome beta, we're exploring a new way for you to share your computer without sharing your business.

Get started by clicking on “You” in the upper right corner of your Chrome window and then clicking “Sign in to Chrome.” You’ll be able to switch devices and pick up where you left off with all of your tabs, bookmarks, and history automatically kept in sync.

If you share a computer, click "Switch person" to add your profile and get your own bookmarks, apps, and theme. Switching lets you keep your stuff separate.
With the new “Guest mode,” you can let others use Chrome without letting them see your stuff. And after they’ve closed out their tabs, their browsing information is deleted from your computer as well. To enable Guest mode, click on You (or your name if you’ve signed in) > Switch person > Browse as Guest.
Here's to no more login tango or making friends open incognito tabs. Happy (shared) browsing!

Posted by Roger Tawa, your personal Chrome Engineer

by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at August 28, 2014 04:50 PM

Google Chrome Releases

Stable Channel Update

The stable channel has been updated to 37.0.2062.102 for Windows.  This corrects a bug which led to multi-byte characters sometimes not being rendered on Windows.

As always, if you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at August 28, 2014 04:35 PM

August 27, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Dev channel has been updated to 38.0.2125.26 (Platform version: 6158.12.0) for all Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. A list of changes can be found here.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Dharani Govindan
Google Chrome

by Dharani (noreply@blogger.com) at August 27, 2014 08:25 PM

Admin Console Update

The Admin console has been updated with the following changes to user and device settings:

Known issues are available here. Enterprise customers can report an issue by contacting support.

Lawrence Lui
Google Chrome

by Lawrence L (noreply@blogger.com) at August 27, 2014 07:09 PM

August 26, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Stable Channel Update

The Chrome team is delighted to announce the promotion of Chrome 37 to the stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. Chrome 37.0.2062.94 contains a number of fixes and improvements, including:

 - DirectWrite support on Windows for improved font rendering
 - A number of new apps/extension APIs
 - Lots of under the hood changes for stability and performance

A full list of changes is available in the log.

Security Fixes and Rewards

Note: Access to bug details and links may be kept restricted until a majority of users are updated with a fix. We will also retain restrictions if the bug exists in a third party library that other projects similarly depend on, but haven’t yet fixed.

This update includes 50 security fixes. Below, we highlight fixes that were either contributed by external researchers or particularly interesting. Please see the Chromium security page for more information.

[$30000][386988] Critical CVE-2014-3176, CVE-2014-3177: A special reward to lokihardt@asrt for a combination of bugs in V8, IPC, sync, and extensions that can lead to remote code execution outside of the sandbox.
[$2000][369860] High CVE-2014-3168: Use-after-free in SVG. Credit to cloudfuzzer.
[$2000][387389] High CVE-2014-3169: Use-after-free in DOM. Credit to Andrzej Dyjak.
[$1000][390624] High CVE-2014-3170: Extension permission dialog spoofing. Credit to Rob Wu.
[$4000][390928] High CVE-2014-3171: Use-after-free in bindings. Credit to cloudfuzzer.
[$1500][367567] Medium CVE-2014-3172: Issue related to extension debugging. Credit to Eli Grey.
[$2000][376951] Medium CVE-2014-3173: Uninitialized memory read in WebGL. Credit to jmuizelaar.
[$500][389219] Medium CVE-2014-3174: Uninitialized memory read in Web Audio. Credit to Atte Kettunen from OUSPG.

We would also like to thank Collin Payne, Christoph Diehl, Sebastian Mauer, Atte Kettunen, and cloudfuzzer for working with us during the development cycle to prevent security bugs from ever reaching the stable channel. $8000 in additional rewards were issued.

As usual, our ongoing internal security work responsible for a wide range of fixes:
[406143] CVE-2014-3175: Various fixes from internal audits, fuzzing and other initiatives (Chrome 37).

Many of the above bugs were detected using AddressSanitizer.

Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at August 26, 2014 01:48 PM

Dev Channel Update

The dev channel has been updated to 38.0.2125.24 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

A full list of changes is available in the SVN log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Matthew Yuan
Google Chrome

by matthewyuan@chromium.org (noreply@blogger.com) at August 26, 2014 01:36 PM

Chromium Blog

64 bits of awesome: 64-bit Windows Support, now in Stable!

Today, after a successful experiment with Chrome 64-bit Windows in our Dev and Canary channels in June, 64-bit Windows support is coming to Chrome Stable with the release of Chrome 37.

64-bit Chrome offers many benefits for speed, stability and security. Our measurements have shown that the native 64-bit version of Chrome has improved speed on many of our graphics and media benchmarks. For example, the VP9 codec that’s used in High Definition YouTube videos shows a 15% improvement in decoding performance. Stability measurements from people opted into our Canary, Dev and Beta 64-bit channels confirm that 64-bit rendering engines are almost twice as stable as 32-bit engines when handling typical web content. Finally, on 64-bit, our defense in depth security mitigations such as Partition Alloc are able to far more effectively defend against vulnerabilities that rely on controlling the memory layout of objects.

At this point 64-bit will remain opt-in, so to take advantage of the improvements click on the new “Windows 64-bit” link on the Chrome download page. Currently, the only significant known issue is the lack of 32-bit NPAPI plugin support. The 32-bit channel will remain fully supported for the foreseeable future and we will continue to support 32-bit plugins until NPAPI is removed from Chrome.

We encourage you to give 64-bit Chrome a try. We’re looking forward to hearing your feedback so we can continue to make Chrome the fastest, most secure and stable browser.

Posted by Will Harris, Software Engineer and Embiggener of Bits

by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at August 26, 2014 11:22 AM

August 22, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Dev channel has been updated to 38.0.2125.7 (Platform version: 6158.3.0) for all Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. A list of changes can be found here.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Dharani Govindan
Google Chrome

by Dharani (noreply@blogger.com) at August 22, 2014 10:15 AM

August 21, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update

The dev channel has been updated to 38.0.2125.8 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

A full list of changes is available in the SVN log. Interested in switching release channels? Find outhow. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Matthew Yuan
Google Chrome

by matthewyuan@chromium.org (noreply@blogger.com) at August 21, 2014 07:58 PM

Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to 37.0.2062.94 (Platform version: 5978.59.0) for all Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. A list of changes can be found here.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Josafat Garcia
Google Chrome

by Josafat (noreply@blogger.com) at August 21, 2014 09:41 AM

August 20, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Dev channel has been updated to 38.0.2125.0 (Platform version: 6158.0.0) for all Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. A list of changes can be found here.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Dharani Govindan
Google Chrome

by Dharani (noreply@blogger.com) at August 20, 2014 02:49 PM

Beta Channel Update

The beta channel has been updated to 37.0.2062.94 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

A full list of changes is available in the SVN log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at August 20, 2014 10:27 AM

August 18, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update

The dev channel has been updated to 38.0.2125.0 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

A full list of changes is available in the SVN log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Matthew Yuan
Google Chrome

by matthewyuan@chromium.org (noreply@blogger.com) at August 18, 2014 12:04 PM

August 14, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to 37.0.2062.80 (Platform version: 5978.51.1/5978.51.2 for cr-48) for all Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. A list of changes can be found here.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Josafat Garcia
Google Chrome

by Josafat (noreply@blogger.com) at August 14, 2014 07:32 PM

Google Chrome Blog

That’s not the download you’re looking for...

[Cross-posted on the Google Online Security Blog]

You should be able to use the web safely, without fear that malware could take control of your computer, or that you could be tricked into giving up personal information in a phishing scam.

That’s why we’ve invested so much in tools that protect you online. Our Safe Browsing service protects you from malicious websites and warns you about malicious downloads in Chrome. We’re currently showing more than three million download warnings per week—and because we make this technology available for other browsers to use, we can help keep 1.1 billion people safe.

Starting next week, we’ll be expanding Safe Browsing protection against additional kinds of deceptive software: programs disguised as a helpful download that actually make unexpected changes to your computer—for instance, switching your homepage or other browser settings to ones you don’t want.

We’ll show a warning in Chrome whenever an attempt is made to trick you into downloading and installing such software. (If you still wish to proceed despite the warning, you can access it from your Downloads list.)
As always, be careful and make sure you trust the source when downloading software. Check out these tips to learn how you can stay safe on the web.

Posted by Moheeb Abu Rajab, Staff Engineer, Google Security

by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at August 14, 2014 10:07 AM

August 13, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Chrome for iOS Update

Chrome for iOS has been updated to 36.0.1985.57. This release contains bug fixes and stability improvements, as well as the following security issue:
  • [398925] High CVE-2014-3166: Information disclosure in SPDY. Credit to Antoine Delignat-Lavaud.
The update will be rolling out in the App Store over the next few hours. Known issues are available on the Chrome support site. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome

by Jason Kersey (noreply@blogger.com) at August 13, 2014 03:37 PM

Beta Channel Update

The beta channel has been updated to 37.0.2062.76 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

A full list of changes is available in the SVN log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at August 13, 2014 01:29 PM

August 12, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update

The dev channel has been updated to 38.0.2121.3 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

A full list of changes is available in the SVN log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Matthew Yuan
Google Chrome

by matthewyuan@chromium.org (noreply@blogger.com) at August 12, 2014 08:27 PM

Chrome for Android Update

Chrome for Android has been updated to 36.0.1985.135 and will be available in Google Play over the next few days. This release fixes an issue with pages not loading properly, as well as the following security issue:
  • [398925] High CVE-2014-3166: Information disclosure in SPDY. Credit to Antoine Delignat-Lavaud.
If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. More information about Chrome for Android is available on the Chrome site.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome

by Jason Kersey (noreply@blogger.com) at August 12, 2014 05:23 PM

Stable Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Stable channel has been updated to 36.0.1985.143 (Platform version: 5841.98.0) for all Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, and security updates. Here is the Chromium change log. Systems will be receiving updates over the next several days.

Highlights include:

  • Pepper Flash version 14.0.0.177


If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Ben Henry
Google Chrome

by Ben Henry (noreply@blogger.com) at August 12, 2014 04:10 PM

Stable Channel Update



The Stable Channel has been updated to 36.0.1985.143 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

This release contains a Flash Player update.

Security Fixes and Rewards
This update includes 12 security fixes. Below, we highlight fixes that were either contributed by external researchers or particularly interesting. Please see the Chromium security page for more information.

[$2000][390174] High CVE-2014-3165: Use-after-free in web sockets. Credit to Collin Payne.
[398925] High CVE-2014-3166: Information disclosure in SPDY. Credit to Antoine Delignat-Lavaud.

As usual, our ongoing internal security work responsible for a wide range of fixes:
  • [400950] CVE-2014-3167: Various fixes from internal audits, fuzzing and other initiatives.
Many of the above bugs were detected using AddressSanitizer.

This release fixes a number of crashes and other bugs. A full list of changes is available in the SVN log. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Matthew Yuan
Google Chrome

by matthewyuan@chromium.org (noreply@blogger.com) at August 12, 2014 01:30 PM

August 11, 2014

Google Chrome Blog

A new type of Chromebook with extra-long battery life

Chromebooks were designed for your mobile lifestyle. They’re thin and light, resume instantly, and are easy to use.

Starting today, we’re welcoming a new type of Chromebook into the family, beginning with the Acer Chromebook 13. This new device uses the NVIDIA Tegra K1 processor, so you get the speed you’re used to from Chromebooks with a battery life up to 13 hours. What could you do in thirteen hours?
  • Fly from New York to Beijing
  • Watch the entire set of Harry Potter movies
  • Complete an Iron Man triathlon (average finish time is 12hr 13min)
  • Finish a 1-credit college course
  • Watch 390 adorable cat videos (2 min per video)
  • Use your Chromebook 13 to watch, play and get a lot done
The Acer Chromebook 13 is available now (with optional touchscreen and 1080p resolution) at Amazon and other online retailers from $279.

Posted by Bill Brougher, Engineering Director & frequent flyer








by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at August 11, 2014 02:36 PM