Planet Chromium

November 25, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Stable Channel Update

The stable channel has been updated to 39.0.2171.71 for Windows, Mac and Linux.  This release contains an update for Adobe Flash as well as a number of other fixes. A full list of changes is available in the log.

Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at November 25, 2014 03:06 PM

Google Chrome Blog

Now casting: Comedy Central, Nick and Sesame Street Go

Chromecast is adding seven more great apps to your casting queue. Get bigger laughs with The Daily Show on Comedy Central, learn with Elmo on Sesame Street Go, or cast Nickelodeon and let Spongebob keep your family entertained. And, no matter how far you travel this winter, stay connected with TuneIn for international radio stations and millions of podcasts. With EPIX, YuppTV and ENCORE Play also casting, you have a full lineup of shows, sports, games and movies to last throughout the holiday season.

Posted by Faisal Feroz, Partner Engineering Manager, Elmo’s best friend

by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at November 25, 2014 09:52 AM

November 24, 2014

Chromium Blog

The Final Countdown for NPAPI

Last September we announced our plan to remove NPAPI support from Chrome, a change that will improve Chrome’s security, speed, and stability as well as reduce complexity in the code base. Since our last update, NPAPI usage has continued its decline. Given this usage data, we will continue with our deprecation plan.

Monthly Plug-in Launch Percentage


Sept 13 May 14 Oct 14
Silverlight 15% 13.3% 11%
Google Talk 8.7% 8.7% 7%
Java 8.9% 7.2% 3.7%
Facebook 6% 4.2% 3.0%
Unity 9.1% 3.1% 1.9%
Google Earth 9.1% 0.1% 0.1%

Currently Chrome supports NPAPI plugins, but they are blocked by default unless the user chooses to allow them for specific sites (via the page action UI). A small number of the most popular plugins are whitelisted and allowed by default. In January 2015 we will remove the whitelist, meaning all plugins will be blocked by default.

In April 2015 NPAPI support will be disabled by default in Chrome and we will unpublish extensions requiring NPAPI plugins from the Chrome Web Store. Although plugin vendors are working hard to move to alternate technologies, a small number of users still rely on plugins that haven’t completed the transition yet. We will provide an override for advanced users (via chrome://flags/#enable-npapi) and enterprises (via Enterprise Policy) to temporarily re-enable NPAPI while they wait for mission-critical plugins to make the transition.

In September 2015 we will remove the override and NPAPI support will be permanently removed from Chrome. Installed extensions that require NPAPI plugins will no longer be able to load those plugins.

For more details on the timeline, including guidance for NPAPI plugin developers, see the NPAPI deprecation guide. With each step in this transition, we get closer to a safer, more mobile-friendly web.

Posted by Justin Schuh, Software Engineer and Plug-in Retirement Planner

by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at November 24, 2014 09:22 AM

November 20, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Dev channel has been updated to 40.0.2214.10 (Platform version: 6457.8.0) for all Chrome OS devices except HP Chromebook and HP Chromebook 11. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. A list of changes can be found here.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Daniel Xie
Google Chrome

by Daniel xie (noreply@blogger.com) at November 20, 2014 05:03 PM

Stable Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Stable channel has been updated to 39.0.2171.85 (Platform version: 6310.48.0) for all Chrome OS devices except Dell Chromebook 11, HP Chromebook 14, Acer C720 and the Toshiba Chromebook. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. Systems will be receiving updates over the next couple weeks as the team takes a break over the holiday. Here is a list of Chromium changes.

Some highlights of these changes are:
  • Enable Chromecast support for media files stored on Google Drive
  • Update Network Error page design
  • Display apps installed in Google Drive in the Chrome OS Launcher
If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).


Ben Henry
Google Chrome

by Ben Henry (noreply@blogger.com) at November 20, 2014 03:34 PM

Chrome Beta for Android Update

Chrome Beta for Android has been updated to 39.0.2171.90 and will be available in Google Play over the next few hours. This release fixes various stability and performance bugs.  A partial list of changes in this build is available in the Git log. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. More information about Chrome for Android is available on the Chrome site.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at November 20, 2014 03:23 PM

Beta Channel Update

The Chrome team is excited to announce the promotion of Chrome 40 to the beta channel with 40.0.2214.10 for Windows, Linux and Mac.

This release contains many stability and developer improvements including:
  • Profile Lock, which introduces the ability to "child lock" signed-in profiles.
  • New Tabs Page Suggestions, which tries to determine which sites you'd like to visit depending on the the time and day.
  • New crash recovery UI.
A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Matthew Yuan
Google Chrome

by matthewyuan@chromium.org (noreply@blogger.com) at November 20, 2014 02:28 PM

Dev Channel Update

The dev channel has been updated to 41.0.2224.3 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at November 20, 2014 08:38 AM

Admin Console Update

The Admin console has been updated with the following changes to user and device settings:
  • A new user setting allows admins to set the behavior of the top row of keys on a Chrome device keyboard.

Known issues are available here. Enterprise customers can report an issue by contacting support.

Lawrence Lui
Google Chrome

by Lawrence L (noreply@blogger.com) at November 20, 2014 02:41 AM

November 19, 2014

Google Chrome Blog

Bookmarks get a new look and learn a few new tricks

We all know how hard it can be to find something once you've saved it. Starting today, it's a lot easier thanks to an update to bookmarks in the latest Chrome Beta. We’ll be rolling this feature gradually out over the next few weeks. Try out the new Bookmarks Manager by going to your Chrome Menu  > Bookmarks > Bookmarks Manager.

Now when you create a bookmark, you can select an image and add a note or snippet to help you find that bookmark more quickly later. Google will also suggest a folder if it seems like it could be a fit.

The new bookmarks get even better if you’re signed in to Chrome with sync enabled:
  • Improved search: Quickly find that elusive page with search powered by Google, which looks not only at the bookmark title and snippet, but also the bookmarked page’s content. 
  • Collect bookmarks by topic: Your bookmarks will automatically be organized by topic, like “Tokyo” and “Photography.” If you’d rather, you can still organize them into folders yourself.
  • Familiar bookmarks, new look: Your existing bookmarks will automatically get updated with images and descriptions, wherever possible.
  • Share: Have a folder of favorite bookmarks? You can make it public and share the link with whomever you’d like to access it. 
  • Access your bookmarks anywhere: Bookmarked an article on your phone to finish reading on your laptop? Chrome will continue to sync your bookmarks across all of your devices, just like it does today. 

Adding, organizing, and browsing your bookmarks is now easier (and prettier) than ever before. Have any questions about your new bookmarks? Join the discussion here.

Posted by Cynthia Johanson, Product Manager and Super Star-rer

by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at November 19, 2014 09:00 AM

November 18, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to 39.0.2171.85 (Platform version: 6310.48.0) for all Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. Here is a list of Chromium changes.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Ben Henry
Google Chrome

by Ben Henry (noreply@blogger.com) at November 18, 2014 07:13 PM

Google Chrome Blog

Walk in the footsteps of heroes in “A Journey Through Middle-earth”

In time for the epic conclusion to the Hobbit trilogy we’ve updated the Chrome Experiment, “A Journey Through Middle-earth.” Whether you’re a hobbit, wizard or dwarf (oh yeah, humans too) you can now relive all of the epic Middle-earth adventures, from Frodo’s journey to Mount Doom in The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring to Bilbo’s final battle in The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies, in theaters December 17th. This year's Chrome Experiment was developed by North Kingdom in collaboration with Warner Bros. Pictures, New Line Cinema and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures (MGM).

Your adventure starts on a beautiful, interactive map of Middle-earth where you can explore all 27 locations from the Lord of the Rings and Hobbit film trilogies. This year’s map is rich with 3D animations highlighting the paths of eight key characters, including Bilbo, Gandalf and Bard.

Completely new for this year’s version is a peer-to-peer battle game where you can challenge your friends to a test of skill. The peer-to-peer gameplay experience was built primarily using the latest web technologies, including WebRTC and WebGL. It’s touch optimized for laptops, phones and tablets, bringing you a stunning interactive experience across all your devices.


Just go to goo.gl/TheHobbit on your laptop, phone or tablet to check out the latest Chrome Experiment, “A Journey through Middle-earth.”

And for those of you who are more interested in geeking out about web development than exploring Middle-earth, check out our technical case study on HTML5Rocks.com.

Posted by Ian Ellison-Taylor, Chrome Product Manager and human defender of Minas Tirith

by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at November 18, 2014 12:00 PM

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel update

The dev channel has been updated to 40.0.2214.10 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

A full list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.


Matthew Yuan
Google Chrome

by matthewyuan@chromium.org (noreply@blogger.com) at November 18, 2014 11:19 AM

Stable Channel Update

The Chrome team is delighted to announce the promotion of Chrome 39 to the stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. Chrome 39.0.2171.65 contains a number of fixes and improvements, including:
  • 64-bit support for Mac
  • A number of new apps/extension APIs 
  • Lots of under the hood changes for stability and performance 
A partial list of changes is available in the log.

Security Fixes and Rewards

Note: Access to bug details and links may be kept restricted until a majority of users are updated with a fix. We will also retain restrictions if the bug exists in a third party library that other projects similarly depend on, but haven’t yet fixed.

This update includes 42 security fixes. Below, we highlight fixes that were either contributed by external researchers or particularly interesting. Please see the Chromium security page for more information.

[$500][389734] High CVE-2014-7899: Address bar spoofing. Credit to Eli Grey.
[$1500][406868] High CVE-2014-7900: Use-after-free in pdfium. Credit to Atte Kettunen from OUSPG.
[$1000][413375] High CVE-2014-7901: Integer overflow in pdfium. Credit to cloudfuzzer.
[$1000][414504] High CVE-2014-7902: Use-after-free in pdfium. Credit to cloudfuzzer.
[$3000][414525] High CVE-2014-7903: Buffer overflow in pdfium. Credit to cloudfuzzer.
[$2000][418161] High CVE-2014-7904: Buffer overflow in Skia. Credit to Atte Kettunen from OUSPG.
[$2000][421817] High CVE-2014-7905: Flaw allowing navigation to intents that do not have the BROWSABLE category. Credit to WangTao(neobyte) of Baidu X-Team.
[$500][423030] High CVE-2014-7906: Use-after-free in pepper plugins. Credit to Chen Zhang (demi6od) of the NSFOCUS Security Team.
[$7500][423703] High CVE-2014-0574: Double-free in Flash. Credit to biloulehibou.
[$5000][424453] High CVE-2014-7907: Use-after-free in blink. Credit to Chen Zhang (demi6od) of the NSFOCUS Security Team.
[$500][425980] High CVE-2014-7908: Integer overflow in media. Credit to Christoph Diehl.
[$500][391001] Medium CVE-2014-7909: Uninitialized memory read in Skia. Credit to miaubiz.

We would also like to thank Atte Kettunen, Christian Holler, cloudfuzzer, and mmaliszkiewicz for working with us during the development cycle to prevent security bugs from ever reaching the stable channel. $16500 in additional rewards were issued.

As usual, our ongoing internal security work was responsible for a wide range of fixes:
[433500] CVE-2014-7910: Various fixes from internal audits, fuzzing and other initiatives.

Many of the above bugs were detected using AddressSanitizer or MemorySanitizer.

Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at November 18, 2014 08:56 AM

November 14, 2014

Igalia Chromium

Andy Wingo: generators in firefox now twenty-two times faster

It's with great pleasure that I can announce that, thanks to Mozilla's Jan de Mooij, the new ES6 generator functions are twenty-two times faster in Firefox!

Some back-story, for the unawares. There's a new version of JavaScript coming, ECMAScript 6 (ES6). Among the new features that ES6 brings are generator functions: functions that can suspend. Firefox's JavaScript engine, SpiderMonkey, has had support for generators for many years, long before other engines. This support was upgraded to the new ES6 standard last year, thanks to sponsorship from Bloomberg, and was shipped out to users in Firefox 26.

The generators implementation in Firefox 26 was quite basic. As you probably know, modern JavaScript implementations have a number of tiered engines. In the case of SpiderMonkey there are three tiers: the interpreter, the baseline compiler, and the optimizing compiler. Code begins execution in the interpreter, which is the quickest engine to start. If a piece of code is hot -- meaning that lots of time is being spent there -- then it will "tier up" to the next level, where it is analyzed, possibly optimized, and then compiled to machine code.

Unfortunately, generators in SpiderMonkey have always been stuck at the lowest tier, the interpreter. This is because of SpiderMonkey's choice of implementation strategy for generators. Generators were implemented as "floating interpreter stack frames": heap-allocated objects whose shape was exactly the same as a stack frame in the interpreter. This had the advantage of being fairly cheap to implement in the beginning, but ultimately it made them unable to take advantage of JIT compilation, as JIT code runs on its own stack which has a different layout. The previous strategy also relied on trampolining through a helper written in C++ to resume generators, which killed optimization opportunities.

The solution was to represent suspended generator objects as snapshots of the state of a stack frame, instead of as stack frames themselves. In order for this to be efficient, last year we did a number of block scope optimizations to try and reduce the amount of state that a generator frame would have to restore. Finally, around March of this year we were at the point where we could refactor the interpreter to implement generators on the normal interpreter stack, with normal interpreter bytecodes, with the vision of being able to JIT-compile those bytecodes.

I ran out of time before I could land that patchset; although the patches were where we wanted to go, they actually caused generators to be even slower and so they languished in Bugzilla for a few more months. Sad monkey. It was with delight, then, that a month or so ago I saw that SpiderMonkey JIT maintainer Jan de Mooij was interested in picking up the patches. Since then he has been hacking off and on at getting my old patches into shape, and ended up applying them all.

He went further, optimizing stack frames to not reserve space for "aliased" locals (locals allocated on the scope chain), speeding up object literal creation in the baseline compiler and finally has implemented baseline JIT compilation for generators.

So, after all of that perf nargery, what's the upshot? Twenty-two times faster! In this microbenchmark:

function *g(n) {
    for (var i=0; i<n; i++)
        yield i;
}
function f() {
    var t = new Date();
    var it = g(1000000);
    for (var i=0; i<1000000; i++)
	it.next();
    print(new Date() - t);
}
f();

Before, it took SpiderMonkey 980 milliseconds to complete on Jan's machine. After? Only 43! It's actually marginally faster than V8 at this point, which has (temporarily, I think) regressed to 45 milliseconds on this test. Anyway. Competition is great and as a committer to both projects I find it very satisfactory to have good implementations on both sides.

As in V8, in SpiderMonkey generators cannot yet reach the highest tier of optimization. I'm somewhat skeptical that it's necessary, too, as you expect generators to suspend fairly frequently. That said, a yield point in a generator is, from the perspective of the optimizing compiler, not much different from a call site, in that it causes all locals to be saved. The difference is that locals may have unboxed representations, so we would have to box those values when saving the generator state, and unbox on restore.

Thanks to Bloomberg for funding the initial work, and big, big thanks to Mozilla's Jan de Mooij for picking up where we left off. Happy hacking with generators!

by Andy Wingo at November 14, 2014 08:41 AM

November 13, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to 39.0.2171.60 (Platform version: 6310.43.0) for all Chrome OS devices except Lenovo ThinkPad 11e Chromebook, HP Chromebook 14, Toshiba Chromebook, Acer C720 and Dell Chromebook 11. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. Here is a list of Chromium changes.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Ben Henry
Google Chrome

by Ben Henry (noreply@blogger.com) at November 13, 2014 06:54 PM

Dev Channel Update

The dev channel has been updated to 40.0.2214.6 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

A full list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.


Matthew Yuan
Google Chrome

by matthewyuan@chromium.org (noreply@blogger.com) at November 13, 2014 03:44 PM

Igalia Chromium

Sergio Villar: BlinkOn 3

Last week I attended BlinkOn3 held at Google’s Mountain View office. Not only that but I also had the pleasure of giving a speech about what has been taking most of my time lately, the CSS Grid Layout implementation.

Although there were several talks already scheduled for some weeks, the conference itself is very dynamic in the sense that new talks were added as people started to propose new topics to discuss.

I found quite interesting the talks about the State of Blink and also the incoming changes related to Slimming Paint. Exciting times ahead!

My talk was about the CSS Grid Layout work Igalia has been carrying out for several months now (also thanks to Bloomberg sponsorship). The talk was very well received (we were not a lot of people mainly because my talk was rescheduled trice), and people in general is quite excited about the new opportunities for web authors the spec will bring.

The slides are here (3.3MB PDF). They look a bit blurry, that’s because its original format was the Google’s HTML5 io-2012-slides which allowed me to do a lot of live demos.

I also had the opportunity to talk to Julien Chaffraix about the next steps. We both are quite confident about the status of the implementation, so we decided to eventually send the “Intent to ship” at some point during Q4. Very good news for web authors! The most important things to address before the shipping are the handling of absolutely positioned items and a couple of issues related to grids with indefinite remaining space.

by svillar at November 13, 2014 11:29 AM

November 12, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update

The beta channel has been updated to 39.0.2171.62 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at November 12, 2014 12:14 PM

Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Dev channel has been updated to 40.0.2214.3 (Platform version: 6457.0.0) for all Chrome OS devices except HP Chromebook and HP Chromebook 11. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. A list of changes can be found here.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Daniel Xie
Google Chrome

by Daniel xie (noreply@blogger.com) at November 12, 2014 11:27 AM

Chrome for Android Update

The Chrome Team is excited to announce the release of Chrome 39 for Android. Chrome 39.0.2171.59 will be available in Google Play over the next few hours. This release contains a number of bug fixes and performance improvements! A partial list of changes in this build are available in the Git log. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. More information about Chrome for Android is available on the Chrome site.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at November 12, 2014 11:24 AM

November 11, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update

The dev channel has been updated to 40.0.2214.5 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

A full list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.


Matthew Yuan
Google Chrome

by matthewyuan@chromium.org (noreply@blogger.com) at November 11, 2014 04:13 PM

Google Chrome Blog

Introducing fun family games for Chromecast

Over the past year Chromecast has added hundreds of your favorite apps, and brought anything on the web to the TV via Android mirroring and Chrome tab casting. Just in time for the holidays, we’re adding even more apps to the list. So whether you’re looking forward to a quiet evening watching your favorite holiday heartwarmer or a rousing game night with the gang, there’s something for everyone.

Family-friendly games for Chromecast

Chromecast uses your phone or tablet as the controller and your TV screen like a game or score board to let you play games like Wheel of Fortune or classics like Hasbro’s Monopoly Dash, Scrabble Blitz, Connect Four Quads and Simon Swipe on your big screen.

If you prefer to dance around, check out Just Dance Now. Your smartphone can tell if you’re fist pumping high or shaking your hands down low, which earns you points. To show off your mental moves instead, Big Web Quiz and Emoji Party for Chromecast bring trivia to the TV. Astound your friends with your answers to questions like: How many goats tall is Taylor Swift? What does the "Queen of Hearts" look like in emoji? Big Web Quiz uses Google Knowledge Graph to create hundreds of questions, while Emoji Party uses your knowledge of emojis to guess movie titles based on the pictures.

There's no hassle or expense with extra controllers. Anyone with a phone or tablet can join in on any of these games, so download these apps from the Play Store or App Store so all your family and friends can shake it, show off their smarts or just play.

More movies and shows with Showtime Anytime and Starz

Nothing says winter like a TV binge on a cold, gray day. With Showtime Anytime you can catch up on past and current seasons of the network’s original series including Homeland and The Affair. With Starz Play, get your tartan on with the first season of Outlander, or have a marathon of Friday night flicks.

Easily explore and discover new things to cast 

To make it easier for you to navigate through the many great apps available with Chromecast and find exactly what you’d like to cast, we’ve added category tabs to the chromecast.com/apps page. Choose from TV & Movies, Music & Audio, Games, Sports, Photos & Video, or More.
Posted by Wendi Zhang, three-peat Scrabble champ

by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at November 11, 2014 01:48 PM

Google Chrome Releases

Stable Channel Update

The stable channel has been updated to 38.0.2125.122 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

This release contains an update for Adobe Flash as well as a number of other fixes. A full list of changes is available in the log.

Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.


Matthew Yuan
Google Chrome

by matthewyuan@chromium.org (noreply@blogger.com) at November 11, 2014 10:52 AM

November 09, 2014

Igalia Chromium

Andy Wingo: ffconf 2014

Last week I had the great privilege of speaking at ffconf in Brighton, UK. It was lovely. The town put on a full demonstration of its range of November weather patterns, from blue skies to driving rain to hail (!) to sea-spray to drizzle and back again. Good times.

The conference itself was quite pleasant as well, and from the speaker perspective it was amazing. A million thanks to Remy and Julie for making it such a pleasure. ffconf is mostly a front-end development conference, so it's not directly related with the practice of my work on JS implementations -- perhaps you're unaware, but there aren't so many browser implementors that actually develop content for their browsers, and indeed fewer JS implementors that actually write JS. Me, I sling C++ all day long and the most JavaScript I write is for tests. When in the weeds, sometimes we forget we're building an amazing runtime and that people do inspiring things with it, so it's nice to check in with front-end folks at their conferences to see what people are excited about.

My talk was about the part of JavaScript implementations that are written in JavaScript itself. This is an area that isn't so well known, and it has its amusing quirks. I think it can be interesting to a curious JS hacker who wants to spelunk down a bit to see what's going on in their browsers. Intrepid explorers might even find opportunities to contribute patches. Anyway, nerdy stuff, but that's basically how I roll.

The slides are here: without images (350kB PDF) or with images (3MB PDF).

I haven't been to the UK in years, and being in a foreign country where everyone speaks my native language was quite refreshing. At the same time there was an awkward incident in which I was reminded that though close, American and English just aren't the same. I made this silly joke that if you get a polyfill into a JS implementation, then shucks, you have a "gollyfill", 'cause golly it made it in! In the US I think "golly" is just one of those milquetoast profanities, "golly" instead of "god" like saying "shucks" instead of "shit". Well in the UK that's a thing too I think, but there is also another less fortunate connotation, in which "golly" as a noun can be a racial slur. Check the Wikipedia if you're as ignorant as I was. I think everyone present understood that wasn't my intention, but if that is not the case I apologize. With slides though it's less clear, so I've gone ahead and removed the joke from the slides. It's probably not a ball to take and run with.

However I do have a ball that you can run with though! And actually, this was another terrible joke that wasn't bad enough to inflict upon my audience, but that now chance fate gives me the opportunity to use. So never fear, there are still bad puns in the slides. But, you'll have to click through to the PDF for optimal groaning.

Happy hacking, JavaScripters, and until next time.

by Andy Wingo at November 09, 2014 05:36 PM

November 07, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Dev channel has been updated to 40.0.2209.2 (Platform version: 6436.1.0) for all Chrome OS devices except HP Chromebook and HP Chromebook 11. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. A list of changes can be found here.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Daniel Xie
Google Chrome

by Daniel xie (noreply@blogger.com) at November 07, 2014 05:42 AM

November 06, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to 39.0.2171.54 (Platform version: 6310.36.0) for all Chrome OS devices except The Samsung Chromebook, HP Chromebook and HP Chromebook 11. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. Here is a list of Chromium changes.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Ben Henry
Google Chrome

by Ben Henry (noreply@blogger.com) at November 06, 2014 06:46 PM

November 05, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update

The beta channel has been updated to 39.0.2171.52 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

A full list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at November 05, 2014 10:24 AM