Planet Chromium

July 26, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Admin Console Update

The Admin console has been updated with changes to user settings, device settings, and device information.


  • Logging in using single sign-on can now be enabled via a new user policy. The SSO configuration must use SSL.
  • The user field in device details is now automatically populated with the username that first enrolled the device to the domain. The field can be edited after auto-population.
  • Forced Re-Enrollment will now work with all Chrome devices that have updated to version 36 and above. Devices will not need to be enrolled on any specific version.
  • Automatic Enrollment will no longer be available as a setting over the next couple of weeks.


Known issues are available here. Enterprise customers can report an issue by contacting support.


Lawrence Lui

Google Chrome

by Lawrence L (noreply@blogger.com) at July 26, 2014 12:17 AM

July 25, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Chrome for Android Update

Chrome for Android has been updated to 36.0.1985.141 and will be available in Google Play over the next few days. This release fixes an issue with WebRTC permissions. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. More information about Chrome for Android is available on the Chrome site.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome

by Jason Kersey (noreply@blogger.com) at July 25, 2014 09:18 AM

July 24, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS


The Beta channel has been updated to 37.0.2062.29 (Platform version:  5978.26.0) for all Chrome OS devices except Samsung Chromebook, Samsung Chromebook 2, Samsung Chromebook Series 5, HP Chromebook 11. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. Systems will be receiving updates over the next several days. Here is a list of Chromium changes.

Some highlights of these changes are:

  • Multi-profile support
  • New "App info" view in the Chrome launcher
  • Settings appear in a window, not tab
  • Save to Google Drive in Incognito mode

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Josafat Garcia
Google Chrome

by Josafat (noreply@blogger.com) at July 24, 2014 06:22 PM

Chrome Beta for Android Update

The Chrome Team is excited to announce the beta release of Chrome 37 for Android. Chrome 37.0.2062.39 will be available in Google Play over the next few hours. This release contains a number of new features including:
  • Material Design updates
  • Simplified sign-in
  • Lots of bug fixes and performance improvements!
You can find out more on the Chrome blog. A partial list of changes in this build is available in the SVN revision log. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. More information about Chrome for Android is available on the Chrome site.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome

by Jason Kersey (noreply@blogger.com) at July 24, 2014 12:29 PM

Google Chrome Blog

Simplified sign-in with Chrome for Android

If you’ve typed your password on a tiny on-screen keyboard recently, you know how frustrating it can be. Well, say goodbye to all those "x"s when you meant "c"s. Now with the latest Chrome beta for Android when you’re signed into Chrome, you won’t need to sign in again on Google websites, including Gmail, Maps or Search.
To sign into Chrome, simply click on > Settings > Sign in to Chrome.
When you add more than one Google Account to your device, you'll also be automatically signed in to those accounts on the web. In addition to having your accounts a click away, your bookmarks, passwords, and other Chrome stuff will be kept in sync across your devices, using the account you choose.
For the eagle-eyed out there, you might also notice that this version of Chrome is starting to sport some of the elements of Material Design, Android's latest design look and feel, as well:


Posted by Travis McCoy, Product Manager and Password Fumbler

by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at July 24, 2014 12:00 PM

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update

The beta channel has been updated to 37.0.2062.44 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

A full list of changes is available in the SVN log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at July 24, 2014 11:53 AM

Google Chrome Blog

Happy 1st Birthday, Chromecast!

Today our little one, Chromecast, celebrates a year. We built Chromecast to make it easier for people to enjoy their favorite entertainment from their phone, tablet or laptop on the largest screen in the house—the TV. Since Chromecast launched, people have hit the cast button more than 400 million times to enjoy their favorite sports, music, premium movies and TV shows. We’ve added hundreds of your favorite apps, including WatchESPN, Pandora, Hulu Plus, HBO GO and PBS Kids; announced new features like mirroring your Android device to the TV and expanded to 30,000 stores across 20 countries.
To celebrate Chromecast’s birthday, Google Play Music is offering All Access subscriptions free for 90 days to anyone with a Chromecast (and who isn’t already an All Access subscriber). This offer will be available in the U.S. starting today, July 24, 2014 through September 30, 2014. If you already have a Chromecast, go to chromecast.com/offers to redeem this offer. Visit the Help Center to learn more.   
Whether you’re a Chromecast old-timer or just getting started, here are five fun ways to get more out of your TV experience:

Jam out to a summertime playlist
Whether you’re hosting a dinner party or cleaning up around the house, enjoy your favorite summer hits from Google Play Music, Songza or Pandora on your TV.

Watch a video playlist from YouTube
Create a video playlist from the YouTube app and cast it to the TV. Friends can add videos to the queue, so you’ll always have another one on deck.

Cast your photos to the big screen 
No more figuring out old-fashioned projectors or huddling around the phone. Cast your photos from your Android phone or tablet so everyone can enjoy those beautiful pics from your camping trip in Yosemite or your sister’s wedding in Hawaii. 

Enjoy action-packed live sports in your living room 
Tune in to live sports with MLB.TV Premium and MLS Live on Chromecast. And come fall, you can invite your buddies over, pass around the popcorn bowl, and watch college football or NFL’s Monday Night Football with the WatchESPN app on the living room TV. 

Work up a sweat 
With apps like Daily Burn on the rise, it’s easier than ever to work out at home. But can you really do downward-facing dog while holding your tablet? Cast your workout so you can truly get a good morning sweat session in.

We’re not done yet. In the coming months, we’ll be making more updates, like the ability to allow others to cast to your TV without needing to be on the same WiFi network, and a customizable homescreen with personal photos or beautiful art. Your Chromecast will be automatically updated with these new features once they’re available. 

Happy birthday, Chromecast. Here’s to another great year ahead! 

Posted by Mario Queiroz, proud papa of Chromecast








by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at July 24, 2014 09:13 AM

July 23, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update

The beta channel has been updated to 37.0.2062.35 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

A full list of changes is available in the SVN log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at July 23, 2014 01:35 PM

July 22, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update

The dev channel has been updated to 38.0.2101.0 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

A full list of changes is available in the SVN log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Matthew Yuan
Google Chrome

by matthewyuan@chromium.org (noreply@blogger.com) at July 22, 2014 02:01 PM

Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Dev channel has been updated to 37.0.2062.29 (Platform version: 5978.26.0) for all Chrome OS devices except the Samsung Series 5 550. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. A list of changes can be found here.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Josafat Garcia
Google Chrome

by Josafat (noreply@blogger.com) at July 22, 2014 11:46 AM

Stable Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Stable channel has been updated to 36.0.1985.126 for the devices listed below:
  • 5841.73.0 for CR48, Acer AC700, Acer C7 C710, ASUS Chromebook C200, ASUS Chromebox, Lenovo N20 Chromebook, Lenovo Thinkpad 11e Chromebook, Lenovo X131e, LG Chromebase, Samsung Series 3 Chromebook, Samsung Series 5 Chromebook, Samsung Chromebook 2 (11"), Samsung Chromebook 2 (13"), and the New Samsung Chromebook
  • 5841.74.0 for the Acer C720, Dell Chromebook 11 for Education and the Toshiba Chromebook
  • 5841.76.0 for Google Pixel and the Samsung Series 5 550 Chromebook 
This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. Systems will be receiving updates over the next several days. Here is a list of Chromium changes.

Some highlights of these changes are: 
  • Users can adjust time if their clock is out of sync and they have no network connection 
  • The on-screen keyboard to support IMEs 
  • We launched a touch-enabled window manager for Chrome OS available on select convertible devices
  • Supervised users: ability to import existing supervised users, and to set a new password from chrome.com/manage
  • If you have a touch-enabled device, you can now scale a webpage to zoom in on content via pinch to zoom
If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Ben Henry
Google Chrome

by Ben Henry (noreply@blogger.com) at July 22, 2014 10:55 AM

Beta Channel Update

The Beta Channel has been updated to 37.0.2062.20 for Chrome 64-bit on Windows.

This release fixes a number of crashes and other bugs. A full list of changes is available in the SVN log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Daniel Xie
Google Chrome

by Daniel xie (noreply@blogger.com) at July 22, 2014 07:41 AM

July 21, 2014

Chromium Blog

Chrome 37 Beta: DirectWrite on Windows and the <dialog> element

Today’s Chrome Beta channel release includes a slew of new developer features to help you make richer, faster and more compelling web content and apps, especially for mobile devices. Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to Chrome for Android, Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome OS.

DirectWrite on Windows

Chrome 37 adds support for DirectWrite, an API on Windows for clear, high-quality text rendering even on high DPI displays. Before DirectWrite, Chrome used the Graphics Device Interface (GDI) to render text. GDI dates back to the mid-80's and reflects the engineering tradeoffs of that time, particularly for slower, lower-resolution machines. The switch to DirectWrite has been a top user request for years, and required extensive re-architecting and streamlining of Chrome's font rendering engine.

Some users should begin seeing better-looking fonts and increased rendering performance as we roll out DirectWrite, with no changes required by web developers. Assuming everything goes smoothly, all users will experience the improvements by the Chrome 37 stable release.

Compare the below screenshots, taken with and without DirectWrite enabled.



New HTML element: <dialog>

In this release we're also adding support for the <dialog> HTML5 element, which enables developers to create styled dialog boxes in their web applications and control them via a JavaScript API. For more details, check out some code samples and see <dialog> in action. The <dialog> element is a better-designed alternative to showModalDialog(), which is now disabled as we recently announced.

Other updates in this release

  • The Web Cryptography JavaScript API is enabled by default starting in Chrome 37, allowing developers to perform cryptographic operations such as hashing, signature generation/verification, and encryption.
  • Subpixel font scaling is now supported, which enables smooth animations of text between font sizes.  
  • TouchEvent co-ordinates are now doubles instead of longs, enabling higher-fidelity touch interactions on high-DPI displays.
  • CSS cursor values "zoom-in" and "zoom-out" are now unprefixed.
  • The number of cores on a physical machine can now be accessed by navigator.hardwareConcurrency.
  • The user's preferred languages are now accessible by navigator.languages, and the languagechange event is fired when this is updated.
  • The CSS Shapes Module allows developers to define non-rectangular text wrapping boundaries around floated elements.
  • NPAPI deprecation continues according to our previously-announced plan with a harder-to-bypass blocking UI
  • The default monospace font on Windows is now Consolas instead of Courier New.
As always, visit chromestatus.com/features for a complete overview of Chrome’s developer features,  and circle +Google Chrome Developers for more frequent updates!

Posted by Emil A Eklund, Software Engineer and Senior Blog DirectWriter



by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at July 21, 2014 05:14 PM

July 18, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update

The Chrome team is excited to announce the promotion of Chrome 37 to the beta channel with 37.0.2062.20 for Windows, Mac and Linux. (Chrome 64-bit for Windows will be coming to the beta channel shortly, stay tuned!)

This release contains many stability and developer improvements including:
  • DirectWrite support on Windows 
  • Redesigned "Save Password" UI
  • Automatic reload of unreachable pages when network becomes available 
  • Dropped Chrome sign-in requirement for Chrome Apps 
  • A number of new apps/extension APIs 
  • Lots of under the hood changes for stability and performance 

A full list of changes in this build is available in the SVN log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at July 18, 2014 12:13 PM

July 17, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update

The dev channel has been updated to 38.0.2096.0 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

A full list of changes is available in the SVN log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Matthew Yuan
Google Chrome

by matthewyuan@chromium.org (noreply@blogger.com) at July 17, 2014 06:58 PM

Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

[EDIT: 7/17/2014]
The Beta channel has been updated to 36.0.1985.126 (Platform version: 5841.73.0) for all Chrome OS devices except the Google Pixel, the Samsung Series 5 550 Chromebook, the HP Chromebook 14, the Toshiba Chromebook, the Acer C720 and the Dell Chromebook 11 for Education.  The Google Pixel and the Samsung Series 5 550 Chromebook have been updated to 36.0.1985.126 (Platform: 5841.76.0) and the HP Chromebook 14, Toshiba Chromebook, Acer C720 and the Dell Chromebook 11 for Education have been updated to 36.0.1985.126 (Platform: 5841.74.0)

This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. Here is a list of Chromium changes.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Ben Henry
Google Chrome

by Ben Henry (noreply@blogger.com) at July 17, 2014 06:03 PM

Chromium Blog

Chrome 36 Beta: element.animate(), HTML Imports, and Object.observe()

Today’s Chrome Beta channel release includes several new developer features to help you make richer, more compelling web content and apps, especially for mobile devices. Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to Chrome for Android, Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome OS.
element.animate()
The forthcoming Web Animations JavaScript API lets you animate web content from script. The element.animate() function included in today’s Beta is the first part of the API to ship in Chrome: it makes it possible to create simple CSS Animations using JavaScript. This means that animations can be dynamically generated without paying a CSS style recalculation cost. Animations created in this way are also cancelable and provide guaranteed end events (in contrast, CSS Transitions only generate events if they cause a style change). Here's an example of how you'd use it:
elem.animate([
{transform: 'translateX(0px)'},
{transform: 'translateX(100px)'}
], 3000);
HTML Imports
HTML Imports, part of the Web Components standards umbrella, offer a way to include HTML documents in other HTML documents using <link rel="import">:
<head>
<link rel="import" href="/path/to/imports/stuff.html">
</head>
An HTML Import can contain CSS, JavaScript, HTML, or anything else an .html file can include. This means they provide a convention for bundling related HTML/CSS/JS (even other HTML Imports) into a single package, making them a fantastic tool for delivering Web Components to users.
Data-binding with Object.observe()
Object.observe() lets you observe changes to JavaScript objects. You can define a callback that observes multiple objects and will receive all changes to any objects in a single asynchronous call. This is especially useful for framework authors implementing data-binding.
// Let's say we have a model with data
var model = {};

// Which we then observe
Object.observe(model, function(changes) {

// This asynchronous callback runs and aggregates changes
changes.forEach(function(change) {

// Letting us know what changed
console.log(change.type, change.name, change.oldValue);
});

});
Other updates in this release
  • Chrome no longer sends touchcancel on touch scroll, improving compatibility with other browsers and making it possible to add touch UI effects like pull-to-refresh without re-implementing scrolling and fling physics in JavaScript.
  • Some CSS properties such as scrollTop and offsetHeight will now return fractional values in browser-zoom situations.
  • The new WOFF 2.0 Web Font compression format offers a 30% average gain over WOFF 1.0 (up to 50%+ in some cases).
  • DevTools now faithfully emulates touch with mouse, allowing you to test touch interactions on Chrome for Android using the mobile emulation feature of DevTools.
  • Unprefixed CSS Transforms enables rich web content by allowing elements to be transformed in two-dimensional or three-dimensional space.
  • The will-change property allows developers to give a hint about which properties are about to change, which can help reduce delays at the beginning of animations in some cases.
As always, visit chromestatus.com/features for a complete overview of Chrome’s developer features, and circle +Google Chrome Developers for more frequent updates!
Posted by Shane Stephens and Doug Stockwell, Animated Software Engineers

by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at July 17, 2014 09:55 AM

July 16, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Stable Channel Update

The Chrome Team is excited to announce the promotion of Chrome 36 to the Stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. Chrome 36.0.1985.125 contains a number of fixes and improvements, including:
  • Rich Notifications Improvements 
  • An Updated Incognito / Guest NTP design
  • The addition of a Browser crash recovery bubble
  • Chrome App Launcher for Linux
  • Lots of under the hood changes for stability and performance

Security Fixes and Rewards

This update includes 26 security fixes. Below, we highlight fixes that were either contributed by external researchers or particularly interesting. Please see the Chromium security page for more information.

[$2000][380885] Medium CVE-2014-3160: Same-Origin-Policy bypass in SVG. Credit to Christian Schneider.

As usual, our ongoing internal security work responsible for a wide range of fixes:
  • [393765] CVE-2014-3162: Various fixes from internal audits, fuzzing and other initiatives.
Many of the above bugs were detected using AddressSanitizer.

Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Matthew Yuan
Google Chrome

by matthewyuan@chromium.org (noreply@blogger.com) at July 16, 2014 04:41 PM

Chromium Blog

Disabling showModalDialog

The web platform has evolved organically over the past two decades, slowly growing new capabilities and APIs. Many features that are added are great ideas that enable web developers to make even better applications. But some APIs turn out, in retrospect, to be mistakes. Over time, the platform accretes more bad APIs, which makes it harder to add new browser features, confuses web developers, and even introduces security bugs. showModalDialog is a bad API that we deprecated earlier this year, and in Chrome 37 we will disable support for it by default.

showModalDialog was first introduced in Internet Explorer 4 and although it was never formally standardized, over time most other browsers added support for it. It allows applications to show a dialog of HTML content that freezes all other content while showing. showModalDialog is not a commonly used API: based on our usage counters, less than 0.006% of pages use it.

Unfortunately, showModalDialog's unique ability to freeze content is now widely regarded as a mis-feature in terms of user experience, code complexity, and security. From a usability perspective, showModalDialog rudely demands that you interact with it by freezing all of your other tabs—even ones from other sites. showModalDialog also requires complex and hard-to-maintain code scattered throughout the codebase. This complexity complicates the behavior of new web features like Mutation Observers, Object.observe, and Promises. It also makes showModalDialog a source of a disproportionate number of bugs, including serious security vulnerabilities. It is for these reasons that we decided to turn off showModalDialog by default in the next version of Chrome.

Although very few sites use showModalDialog, the small minority that do—disproportionately enterprise sites—have come to rely heavily on it. In order to give these sites more time to update, we have added a temporary Enterprise Policy setting to re-enable showModalDialog. In May 2015 this setting will be removed and showModalDialog will be completely removed from Chromium. Affected sites should begin work to update their sites as soon as possible.

Although it can be difficult, sometimes the only way to go forward is to leave the past behind. Removing bad APIs will help us make the web a more consistent and capable platform for both developers and users.

Posted by Adam Barth, Software Engineer

by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at July 16, 2014 03:00 PM

Google Chrome Releases

Chrome for Android Update

The Chrome Team is excited to announce the stable release of Chrome 36 for Android. Chrome 36.0.1985.122 will be available in Google Play over the next few days. This release contains a number of new features including:
  • Improved text rendering on non-mobile optimized sites.
  • Doodles return to the new tab page.
  • Lots of bug fixes and performance improvements! 
Security fixes:
  • [$3000][352083] High CVE-2014-3159: Omnibox URL Spoofing (Android). Credit to Keita Haga.
  • [334204] Medium CVE-2014-3161: Same origin policy bypass (Android). Credit to Håvard Molland from Opera
A partial list of changes in this build is available in the SVN revision log. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. More information about Chrome for Android is available on the Chrome site.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome

by Jason Kersey (noreply@blogger.com) at July 16, 2014 02:08 PM

July 15, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update

The Beta Channel has been updated to 36.0.1985.125 for Windows and Linux

This release fixes a number of crashes and other bugs. A full list of changes is available in the SVN log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

*Update:  Mac has also been updated to 36.0.1985.125.

Matthew Yuan
Google Chrome

by matthewyuan@chromium.org (noreply@blogger.com) at July 15, 2014 05:04 PM

Dev Channel Update

The dev channel has been updated to 37.0.2062.20 for Windows, Mac and Linux.

A full list of changes is available in the SVN log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at July 15, 2014 12:55 PM

Chrome for iOS Update

The Chrome team is excited to announce Chrome 36 for iPhone and iPad. Chrome 36.0.1985.49 contains a number of improvements including:
  • Allows mobile sites that have added Cast support to work with your Cast-enabled device. 
  • Stability improvements and bug fixes.
The update will be rolling out in the App Store over the next few hours. Known issues are available on the Chrome support site. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome

by Jason Kersey (noreply@blogger.com) at July 15, 2014 11:33 AM

July 09, 2014

Google Chrome Blog

Mirror Your Android Screen to the TV with Chromecast

Chromecast makes it easy for you to enjoy your favorite entertainment on the biggest screen in the house. Starting today, you can mirror your Android phone and tablet to the TV so you can see your favorite apps, photos or anything else, exactly as you see it on your mobile device—only bigger. To start mirroring, simply select “Cast Screen” from the navigation drawer in the Chromecast app and select your Chromecast device.  On Nexus devices, this feature is also available through the quick settings menu.

Now, anything on your Android device will appear on the TV. You can share photos stored on your phone with a group of friends, or scope out the scenery for your next family vacation together on the big screen using Google Earth.


This feature is currently in beta and will roll out on popular Android phones or tablets from Samsung, HTC, LG, and others over the next few days. Look out for the 1.7 update of the Chromecast app on Google Play store to use this new feature. 

Posted by Ambarish Kenghe, Chromecast Product Manager and Cast Master

by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at July 09, 2014 10:00 AM

July 08, 2014

Google Chrome Releases

Flash Player Update

We are updating Flash Player to version 14.0.0.145 on Windows and Mac via our component update system (i.e. there will not be a Chrome update).

Release notes for the update can be found on Adobe's release notes page.

Karen Grunberg
Google Chrome

by Karen (noreply@blogger.com) at July 08, 2014 11:00 AM