Planet Chromium

July 27, 2015

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update

The Chrome team is stoked to announce the promotion of Chrome 45 to the beta channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. Chrome 45.0.2454.15 contains our usual under-the-hood performance and stability tweaks, but there's also some cool new features to explore - please head to the Chromium blog to learn more!

A full list of changes in this build is available in the log.  Interested in switching release channels?  Find out how here. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at July 27, 2015 03:33 PM

Chromium Blog

Chrome 45 Beta: New ES2015 features, service worker improvements, and media controls

The newest Chrome Beta channel release includes new JavaScript language features, an improved audio experience on Android, and a large number of minor API improvements and deprecations. Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to Chrome for Android, Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome OS.

New ES2015 features

Over the past year Chrome has shipped a number of new JavaScript features defined in the ES2015 specification (formerly known as ES6), a major update to JavaScript that allows developers to write application logic that is easier to read, more powerful, and more memory efficient than ever before.


Service worker improvements

Chrome 40 introduced support for service workers, enabling developers to build high performance sites that work offline. This release includes a number of improvements:




Finally, in a breaking change, messages sent via Client.postMessage() now fire an event on navigator.serviceWorker instead of the window object.

Media controls in Android notifications

media-notification.png
Playback controls for currently-playing audio are shown in the notification tray and on the lock screen

On Android, native apps can show media controls in a system notification when playing audio, making it easy for users to control audio while multitasking. Chrome 45 brings this capability to the web by showing a notification with media controls when audio is playing in web content. The controls will automatically show up when <audio> or <video> tags play audio longer than 5 seconds.

Other updates in this release



As always, visit chromestatus.com/features for a complete overview of Chrome’s developer features, and circle +Google Chrome Developers for more frequent updates.

Posted by Andreas Rossberg, Software Engineer and ECMAScript Evangelizer

by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at July 27, 2015 01:22 PM

V8 JavaScript Engine

Code caching

V8 uses just-in-time compilation (JIT) to execute Javascript code. This means that immediately prior to running a script, it has to be parsed and compiled - which can cause considerable overhead. As we announced recently, code caching is a technique that lessens this overhead. When a script is compiled for the first time, cache data is produced and stored. The next time V8 needs to compile the same script, even in a different V8 instance, it can use the cache data to recreate the compilation result instead of compiling from scratch. As a result the script is executed much sooner.

Code caching has been available since V8 version 4.2 and not limited to Chrome alone. It is exposed through V8’s API, so that every V8 embedder can take advantage of it. The test case used to exercise this feature serves as an example of how to use this API.

When a script is compiled by V8, cache data can be produced to speed up later compilations by passing v8::ScriptCompiler::kProduceCodeCache as an option. If the compilation succeeds, the cache data is attached to the source object and can be retrieved via v8::ScriptCompiler::Source::GetCachedData. It can then be persisted for later, for example by writing it to disk.

During later compilations, the previously produced cache data can be attached to the source object and passed v8::ScriptCompiler::kConsumeCodeCache as an option. This time, code will be produced much faster, as V8 bypasses compiling the code and deserializes it from the provided cache data.

Producing cache data comes at a certain computational and memory cost. For this reason, Chrome only produces cache data if the same script is seen at least twice within a couple of days. This way Chrome is able to turn script files into executable code twice as fast on average, saving users valuable time on each subsequent page load.

Posted by Yang Guo, Software Engineer

by Michael Hablich (noreply@blogger.com) at July 27, 2015 11:47 AM

July 24, 2015

Google Chrome Releases

Stable Channel Update

The Chrome team is delighted to announce the promotion of Chrome 44 to the stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. Chrome 44.0.2403.89 contains a number of fixes and improvements, including:
  • A number of new apps/extension APIs
  • Lots of under the hood changes for stability and performance
A list of changes is available in the log.  Watch out for upcoming Chrome and Chromium blog posts about new features and big efforts delivered in 44.

Security Fixes and Rewards

Note: Access to bug details and links may be kept restricted until a majority of users are updated with a fix. We will also retain restrictions if the bug exists in a third party library that other projects similarly depend on, but haven’t yet fixed.

This update includes 43 security fixes. Below, we highlight fixes that were contributed by external researchers. Please see the Chromium security page for more information.

[$3000][446032] High CVE-2015-1271: Heap-buffer-overflow in pdfium. Credit to cloudfuzzer.
[$3000][459215] High CVE-2015-1273: Heap-buffer-overflow in pdfium. Credit to makosoft.
[$TBD][461858] High CVE-2015-1274: Settings allowed executable files to run immediately after download. Credit to  andrewm.bpi.
[$7500][462843] High CVE-2015-1275: UXSS in Chrome for Android. Credit to WangTao(neobyte) of Baidu X-Team.
[$TBD][472614] High CVE-2015-1276: Use-after-free in IndexedDB. Credit to Collin Payne.
[$5500][483981] High CVE-2015-1279: Heap-buffer-overflow in pdfium. Credit to mlafon.
[$5000][486947] High CVE-2015-1280: Memory corruption in skia. Credit to cloudfuzzer.
[$1000][487155] High CVE-2015-1281: CSP bypass. Credit to Masato Kinugawa.
[$TBD][487928] High CVE-2015-1282: Use-after-free in pdfium. Credit to Chamal de Silva.
[$TBD][492052] High CVE-2015-1283: Heap-buffer-overflow in expat. Credit to sidhpurwala.huzaifa.
[$2000][493243] High CVE-2015-1284: Use-after-free in blink. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG.
[$7500][504011] High CVE-2015-1286: UXSS in blink. Credit to anonymous.
[$TBD][505374] High CVE-2015-1290: Memory corruption in V8. Credit to Yongjun Liu of NSFOCUS Security Team.
[$1337][419383] Medium CVE-2015-1287: SOP bypass with CSS. Credit to filedescriptor.
[$1000][444573] Medium CVE-2015-1270: Uninitialized memory read in ICU. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG.
[$500][451456] Medium CVE-2015-1272: Use-after-free related to unexpected GPU process termination. Credit to Chamal de Silva.
[479743] Medium CVE-2015-1277: Use-after-free in accessibility. Credit to SkyLined.
[$500][482380] Medium CVE-2015-1278: URL spoofing using pdf files. Credit to Chamal de Silva.
[$1337][498982] Medium CVE-2015-1285: Information leak in XSS auditor. Credit to gazheyes.
[$500][479162] Low CVE-2015-1288: Spell checking dictionaries fetched over HTTP. Credit to mike@michaelruddy.com.

As usual, our ongoing internal security work was responsible for a wide range of fixes:
  • [512110] CVE-2015-1289: Various fixes from internal audits, fuzzing and other initiatives.

Many of the above bugs were detected using AddressSanitizer or MemorySanitizer.

Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Penny MacNeil
Google Chrome

by Penny MacNeil (noreply@blogger.com) at July 24, 2015 02:12 PM

Stable Channel Update

The stable channel has been updated to 44.0.2403.107 for Windows, Mac and Linux. A partial list of changes is available in the log.

Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.


Penny MacNeil
Google Chrome

by Penny MacNeil (noreply@blogger.com) at July 24, 2015 11:13 AM

July 23, 2015

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update

The dev channel has been updated to 45.0.2454.15 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.

A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Vivian Zhi

Google Chrome

by vivianz (noreply@blogger.com) at July 23, 2015 01:21 PM

July 22, 2015

Google Chrome Releases

Admin Console Update


The Admin console has been updated with new policies and improvements to the device details page:

  • Admins can now autocomplete the default domain to use when a user only enters their username at the login screen.
  • A new policy enables users to enter an asset identifier during the enrollment process. The asset ID field in the device details page will now automatically populate with this value if entered at the enrollment screen of the device. On version 44 or above, the asset identifier also appears within the operating system.
  • The device details page now contains a section titled 'System Activity and Troubleshooting'. It contains some of the existing fields as well as the new policies detailed below.
  • Two new options are available in the System Activity and Troubleshooting section of the device details page: Reboot Device and Screen Capture.
Only devices running on version 44 or above are eligible for the new policies.

Known issues are available here. Enterprise customers can report an issue by contacting support.

Lawrence Lui
Google Chrome

by Lawrence L (noreply@blogger.com) at July 22, 2015 03:50 PM

Chromium Blog

Exploring the Physical Web with Chrome for iOS

Today’s connected world is full of opportunities for people to digitally interact with their surroundings on the fly. For example, smart parking meters let users pay through the cloud. But for developers, it’s often difficult to build contextual experiences that people can easily access. Even with the prevalence of smartphones, users are reluctant to install an app or even type a URL while on the go.

The Physical Web is an open source approach to help you build contextual interactions that people can discover and use with less friction. A few months ago, Chrome for iOS added a Today widget to let users open a new tab or do a voice search right from the Notification Center.  The new Chrome for iOS  integrates the Physical Web into the Chrome Today widget, enabling users to access an on-demand list of web content that is relevant to their surroundings.


It’s easy to make your content discoverable via the Physical Web using Eddystone, an open Bluetooth Low Energy beacon format announced last week. Eddystone supports multiple frame types for different use cases. The Physical Web displays content that is broadcasted using Eddystone-URL, the beacon frame type designed to convey compressed URLs. You can add your content to the Physical Web by simply configuring a beacon that supports Eddystone-URL to transmit your URL of choice.

When users who have enabled the Physical Web open the Today view, the Chrome widget scans for broadcasted URLs and displays these results, using estimated proximity of the beacons to rank the content. You can learn more about the types of user experiences that the Physical Web enables by visiting our cookbook and joining the open source community on GitHub.

The new Chrome for iOS is an early exploration in enabling users to access the Physical Web in their day-to-day mobile experiences. As the ecosystem grows,  we’ll continue to explore new ways to bring the Physical Web to users’ fingertips. We’re looking forward to seeing the new contextual experiences you’ll build.

Posted by Jake Leichtling, Physical Web Explorer


by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at July 22, 2015 01:01 PM

Google Chrome Releases

Chrome for iOS Update


The Chrome team is beaming to announce the launch of Chrome 44 for iOS. Chrome 44.0.2403.65 is now available in the AppStore . Newness in this release includes:
  • Swipe to navigate: swipe right or left to navigate backwards and forwards
  • Support for accessing Physical Web content from the Today view
  • Stability improvements and bug fixes 
If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. More information about Chrome for iOS is available on the Chrome site.

Andy Caruso
Google Chrome

by Andy Caruso (noreply@blogger.com) at July 22, 2015 12:58 PM

July 21, 2015

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update

The dev channel has been updated to 45.0.2454.12 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.

A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Krishna Govind
Google Chrome

by Krishna Govind (noreply@blogger.com) at July 21, 2015 05:57 PM

Stable Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Stable channel has been updated to 44.0.2403.90 (Platform version: 7077.95.0) for all Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. Systems will be receiving updates over the next several days.

Some highlights of these changes are:
  • Improved the efficiency of automatic update (Issue: 481230)
  • Wireless headset support (Bluetooth HFP and HSP profiles)
  • Write-access to MTP devices
  • New design for the user sign-in and enterprise enrollment flows
  • OCM Point smartart rendering support
If you find issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (three horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Dharani Govindan
Google Chrome

by Dharani (noreply@blogger.com) at July 21, 2015 11:29 AM

Android WebView Stable Update

The Chrome team is stoked to announce that Android WebView has been updated to 44.0.2403.90.  The release will be available in Google Play over the next few days for devices on Android 5.0 and higher.

This release includes support for ES6 computed property names and the unprefixed Encrypted Media Extensions API.  It also includes performance improvements for Nexus 9 devices as well as stability and security fixes.

Interested in trying the WebView beta channel?  Find out how right here.  If you notice any issues, please file a bug.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome and WebView

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at July 21, 2015 08:52 AM

July 17, 2015

V8 JavaScript Engine

V8 4.5 release

Roughly every six weeks, we create a new branch of V8 as part of our release process. Each version is branched from V8’s git master immediately before Chrome branches for a Chrome Beta milestone. Today we’re pleased to announce our newest branch, V8 version 4.5, which will be in beta until it is released in coordination with Chrome 45 Stable. V8 4.5 is filled will all sorts of developer-facing goodies, so we’d like to give you a preview of some of the highlights in anticipation of the release in several weeks.

Improved ECMAScript 2015 (ES6) support

V8 4.5 adds support for several ECMAScript 2015 (ES6) features.

Arrow Functions

With the help of Arrow Functions it is possible to write more streamlined code.

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let data = [0, 1, 3];
// Code without Arrow Functions
let convertedData = data.map(function(value) { return value*2;});
// Code with Arrow Functions
let convertedData = data.map(value => value*2);
console.log(convertedData);

The lexical binding of 'this' is another major benefit of arrow functions. As a result, using callbacks in methods gets much easier.

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class MyClass {
constructor() { this.a = "Hello, "; }
hello() { setInterval(() => console.log(this.a + "World!"), 1000); }
}
let myInstance = new MyClass();
myInstance.hello();

Array/TypedArray functions

All of the new methods on Arrays and TypedArrays that are specified in ES2015 are now supported in 4.5. They make working with Arrays and TypedArrays more convenient. Among the methods added are Array.from and Array.of. Methods which mirror most Array methods on each kind of TypedArray were added as well.

Object.assign

Object.assign enables developers to quickly merge and clone objects.

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let target = {a: "Hello, "};
let source = {b: "world!"};
// Objects are merged
Object.assign(target, source);
console.log(target.a + target.b);

This feature can also be used to mix in functionality.

More JavaScript language features are “optimizable”

For many years, V8’s traditional optimizing compiler, Crankshaft, has done a great job of optimizing many common JavaScript patterns. However, it never had the capability to support the entire JavaScript language, and using certain language features in a function—such as “try/catch” and “with”—would prevent it from being optimized. V8 would have to fall back to its slower, baseline compiler for that function.

One of the design goals of V8’s new optimizing compiler, TurboFan, is to be able to eventually optimize all of JavaScript, including ECMAScript 2015 features. In V8 4.5, we’ve started using TurboFan to optimize some of the language features that are not supported by Crankshaft: ‘for-of’, ‘class’, ‘with’ and computed property names.

Here is an example of code that uses 'for-of', which can now be compiled by TurboFan:

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let sequence = ["First", "Second", "Third"];
for (let value of sequence) {
// This scope is now optimizable
let object = {a: "Hello, ", b: "world!", c: value};
console.log(object.a + object.b + object.c);
}

Although initially functions that use these language features won't reach the same peak performance as other code compiled by Crankshaft, TurboFan can now speed them up well beyond our current baseline compiler. Even better, performance will continue to improve quickly as we develop more optimizations for TurboFan.

V8 API

Please check out our summary of API changes. This document gets regularly updated a few weeks after each major release.

Developers with an active V8 checkout can use 'git checkout -b 4.5 -t branch-heads/4.5' to experiment with the new features in V8 4.5. Alternatively you can subscribe to Chrome's Beta channel and try the new features out yourself soon.

Posted by the V8 team

by Michael Hablich (noreply@blogger.com) at July 17, 2015 01:39 PM

July 16, 2015

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update

The dev channel has been updated to 45.0.2454.7 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.

A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Krishna Govind
Google Chrome

by Krishna Govind (noreply@blogger.com) at July 16, 2015 11:42 AM

Dev Channel Update

The dev channel has been updated to 45.0.2454.6 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.

A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Krishna Govind
Google Chrome

by Krishna Govind (noreply@blogger.com) at July 16, 2015 10:49 AM

Dev Channel Update

The dev channel has been updated to 45.0.2453.0 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.

A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Anantha Keesara
Google Chrome

by ananthak (noreply@blogger.com) at July 16, 2015 10:49 AM

Beta Channel Update

The beta channel has been updated to 44.0.2403.89 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.

A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Vivian Zhi
Google Chrome

by vivianz (noreply@blogger.com) at July 16, 2015 10:48 AM

July 15, 2015

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Dev channel has been updated to 45.0.2454.4 (Platform version: 7262.0.0 or 7262.1.0) for all Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. A list of changes can be found here.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Matthew Yuan
Google Chrome

by Matthew Yuan (noreply@blogger.com) at July 15, 2015 07:42 PM

Android WebView Beta Update

The Chrome team is happy to announce that the WebView beta channel has been updated to 44.0.2403.90 and will be available in Google Play over the next few days for devices on Android 5.0 and higher.

This release contains miscellaneous performance, stability and other fixes.

Interested in trying the WebView beta channel?  Find out how right here.  If you notice any issues, please file a bug.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome and WebView

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at July 15, 2015 06:47 PM

Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to 44.0.2403.90 (Platform version: 7077.95.0) for all Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. A list of changes can be found here.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Dharani Govindan
Google Chrome

by Dharani (noreply@blogger.com) at July 15, 2015 06:33 PM

July 14, 2015

Google Chrome Releases

Stable Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Stable channel has been updated to 43.0.2357.134 (Platform version: 6946.86.0) for all devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes and security updates.
Systems will be receiving updates over the next several days.  A partial list of these changes is available here

Some highlights of these changes are:
  • Updated Adobe Flash Player to 18.0.0.209-r1

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Josafat Garcia
Google Chrome

by Josafat (noreply@blogger.com) at July 14, 2015 10:49 PM

Stable Channel Update

The stable channel has been updated to 43.0.2357.134 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.  This release contains a critical update to Adobe Flash Player (18.0.0.209) and a fix for a full screen casting issue.

A partial list of changes is available in the log.

Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Are you a project manager,  with a technical background, who is passionate about Chrome and moving the web forward?  We are hiring!

Anthony Laforge
Google Chrome

by laforge@chromium (noreply@blogger.com) at July 14, 2015 07:15 AM

July 13, 2015

V8 JavaScript Engine

Digging into the TurboFan JIT

Last week we announced that we've turned on TurboFan for certain types of JavaScript. In this post we wanted to dig deeper into the design of TurboFan.

Performance has always been at the core of V8’s strategy. TurboFan combines a cutting-edge intermediate representation with a multi-layered translation and optimization pipeline to generate better quality machine code than what was previously possible with the CrankShaft JIT. Optimizations in TurboFan are more numerous, more sophisticated, and more thoroughly applied than in CrankShaft, enabling fluid code motion, control flow optimizations, and precise numerical range analysis, all of which were more previously unattainable.

A layered architecture

Compilers tend to become complex over time as new language features are supported, new optimizations are added, and new computer architectures are targeted. With TurboFan, we've taken lessons from many compilers and developed a layered architecture to allow the compiler to cope with these demands over time. A clearer separation between the source-level language (JavaScript), the VM's capabilities (V8), and the architecture's intricacies (from x86 to ARM to MIPS) allows for cleaner and more robust code. Layering allows those working on the compiler to reason locally when implementing optimizations and features, as well as write more effective unit tests. It also saves code. Each of the 7 target architectures supported by TurboFan requires fewer than 3,000 lines of platform-specific code, versus 13,000-16,000 in CrankShaft. This enabled engineers at ARM, Intel, MIPS, and IBM to contribute to TurboFan in a much more effective way. TurboFan is able to more easily support all of the coming features of ES6 because its flexible design separates the JavaScript frontend from the architecture-dependent backends.

More sophisticated optimizations

The TurboFan JIT implements more aggressive optimizations than CrankShaft through a number of advanced techniques. JavaScript enters the compiler pipeline in a mostly unoptimized form and is translated and optimized to progressively lower forms until machine code is generated. The centerpiece of the design is a more relaxed sea-of-nodes internal representation (IR) of the code which allows more effective reordering and optimization.

Example TurboFan graph
Numerical range analysis helps TurboFan understand number-crunching code much better. The graph-based IR allows most optimizations to be expressed as simple local reductions which are easier to write and test independently. An optimization engine applies these local rules in a systematic and thorough way. Transitioning out of the graphical representation involves an innovative scheduling algorithm that makes use of the reordering freedom to move code out of loops and into less frequently executed paths. Finally, architecture-specific optimizations like complex instruction selection exploit features of each target platform for the best quality code.

Delivering a new level of performance

We're already seeing some great speedups with TurboFan, but there's still a ton of work to do. Stay tuned as we enable more optimizations and turn TurboFan on for more types of code!

Posted by Ben L. Titzer, Software Engineer and TurboFan Mechanic

by Michael Hablich (noreply@blogger.com) at July 13, 2015 10:06 AM

July 10, 2015

V8 JavaScript Engine

Hello, World!

Welcome to the V8 Developer blog!

Historically, the V8 team has published blog posts on the Chromium blog that appeal to the wider web development audience. In order to deliver more in-depth posts especially targeted to the hardcore coder and virtual machine enthusiasts out there, we've spun off this V8-specific blog. Big-tickets items will continue to be posted to the Chromium blog, but we hope you'll stay tuned here for even more posts about advanced compiler techniques, low-level performance optimizations, and all the technical bits that make V8 tick.

Happy reading,

the V8 team

by Michael Hablich (noreply@blogger.com) at July 10, 2015 09:03 AM

July 09, 2015

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to 44.0.2403.81 (Platform version: 7077.76.0) for all Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. A list of changes can be found here.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Dharani Govindan
Google Chrome

by Dharani (noreply@blogger.com) at July 09, 2015 07:10 PM

Beta Channel Update

The beta channel has been updated to 44.0.2403.81 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.

A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Krishna Govind
Google Chrome

by Krishna Govind (noreply@blogger.com) at July 09, 2015 12:56 PM

July 08, 2015

Google Chrome Releases

Stable Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Stable channel has been updated to 43.0.2357.132 (Platform version: 6946.70.0) for all devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes and security updates. Systems will be receiving updates over the next several days. A partial list of these changes is available here

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Josafat Garcia
Google Chrome

by Josafat (noreply@blogger.com) at July 08, 2015 11:09 PM

Android WebView Beta Update

The Chrome team is happy to announce that the WebView beta channel has been updated to 44.0.2403.83 and will be available in Google Play over the next few days for devices on Android 5.0 and higher.

This release contains miscellaneous performance, stability and other fixes.

Interested in trying the WebView beta channel?  Find out how right here.  If you notice any issues, please file a bug.

Alex Mineer
Google Chrome and WebView

by Alex Mineer (noreply@blogger.com) at July 08, 2015 04:51 PM

July 07, 2015

Chromium Blog

Revving up JavaScript performance with TurboFan

The JavaScript ecosystem is evolving in several promising ways. There have been mainstream standards advancements like the recent approval of ECMAScript 2015, as well as early-stage experiments like Strong Mode, to name a few. Balancing the needs of these new directions demands a flexible just-in-time compiler, and we've been hard at work on a brand new compiler for V8, codenamed "TurboFan." Since Chrome 41, TurboFan has been enabled for certain types of code, speeding up traditional content as well as improving performance for new language features.

TurboFan was built from the ground up with many unique capabilities in mind. It optimizes more code than the previous optimizing compiler, supports flexible and dynamic optimization modes, and enables easier contributions and maintenance. Thanks to these features and more, we've turned on TurboFan for some types of code that were challenging for our previous compiler to optimize, such as asm.js, class literals, with scopes, computed property names and for-of loops. TurboFan already shows promising performance results, including a 29% increase on the zlib score of the Octane benchmark.


Over the coming months, we expect to enable TurboFan for more and more types of JavaScript, with the eventual goal of entirely replacing our existing CrankShaft compiler. As it rolls out, developers' code will automatically get these free speedups with no changes needed. Stay tuned for future progress.

Posted by Ben L. Titzer, Software Engineer and TurboFan Mechanic

by Google Chrome Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at July 07, 2015 11:01 AM

Google Chrome Releases

Stable Channel Update

The stable channel has been updated to 43.0.2357.132 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.  A partial list of changes is available in the log.

Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Are you a project manager,  with a technical background, who is passionate about Chrome and moving the web forward?  We are hiring!

Anthony Laforge
Google Chrome

by laforge@chromium (noreply@blogger.com) at July 07, 2015 09:00 AM