Planet Chromium

July 20, 2018

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to 68.0.3440.70 (Platform version: 10718.58.0) for most Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 vertical dots in the upper right corner of the browser).

Bernie Thompson
Google Chrome

by Bernie Thompson (noreply@blogger.com) at July 20, 2018 10:41 AM

July 19, 2018

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Dev channel has been updated to 69.0.3494.0 (Platform version: 10888.0.0) for most Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. A list of changes can be found here.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 vertical dots in the upper right corner of the browser).

Geo Hsu

Google Chrome

by Geo Hsu (noreply@blogger.com) at July 19, 2018 03:16 PM

Chrome Beta for Android Update

Ladies and gentlemen, behold!  Chrome Beta 68 (68.0.3440.70) for Android has been released and is available in Google Play.  A partial list of the changes in this build is available in the Git log. Details on new features is available on the Chromium blog, and developers should check out our updates related to the web platform here.

If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. More information about Chrome for Android is available on the Chrome site.

Estelle Yomba
Google Chrome

by Estelle Yomba (noreply@blogger.com) at July 19, 2018 03:16 PM

July 18, 2018

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update for Desktop

The beta channel has been updated to 68.0.3440.68 for Windows, Mac, and, Linux.


A full list of changes in this build is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels?  Find out how here. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues.


Abdul Syed
Google Chrome

by Abdul Syed (noreply@blogger.com) at July 18, 2018 01:05 PM

July 17, 2018

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update for Desktop

The dev channel has been updated to 69.0.3493.3 for Windows, Mac and Linux.


A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues.

Krishna Govind
Google Chrome

by Krishna Govind (noreply@blogger.com) at July 17, 2018 02:55 PM

July 13, 2018

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Dev channel has been updated to 69.0.3486.0 (Platform version: 10866.1.0) for most Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. A list of changes can be found here.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 vertical dots in the upper right corner of the browser).

Cindy Bayless
Google Chrome

by Cindy Bayless (noreply@blogger.com) at July 13, 2018 07:54 AM

July 12, 2018

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to 68.0.3440.59 (Platform version: 10718.50.0) for most Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. A list of changes can be found here.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 vertical dots in the upper right corner of the browser).

Kevin Bleicher
Google Chrome

by Kevin Bleicher (noreply@blogger.com) at July 12, 2018 12:04 PM

July 11, 2018

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update for Desktop

The beta channel has been updated to 68.0.3440.59 for Windows, Mac, and, Linux.

A full list of changes in this build is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels?  Find out how here. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues.

Abdul Syed
Google Chrome

by Abdul Syed (noreply@blogger.com) at July 11, 2018 02:16 PM

July 10, 2018

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel Update for Desktop

The dev channel has been updated to 69.0.3486.0 for Windows, Mac and Linux.


A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues.

Krishna Govind
Google Chrome

by Krishna Govind (noreply@blogger.com) at July 10, 2018 12:38 PM

Igalia Chromium

Pablo Saavedra: http503

Many times, during these last months, I thought to keep updated my blog writing a new post. Unfortunately, for one or another reason I always found an excuse to not do so. Well, I think that time is over because finally I found something useful and worthy the time spent time on the writing.

– That is OK but … what are you talking about?.
– Be patient Pablo, if you didn’t skip the headline of the post you already know about what I’m talking, probably :-).

Yes, I’m talking about how to setup a MacPro computer into a icecc cluster based on Linux hosts to take advantage of those to get more CPU power to build heavy software projects, like Chromium,  faster. The idea besides this is to distribute all the computational work over Linux nodes (fairly cheaper than any Mac) requested for cross-compiling tasks from the Mac host.

I’ve been working as a sysadmin at Igalia for the last couple of years. One of my duties here is to support and improve the developers building infrastructures. Recently we’ve faced long building times for heavy software projects like, for instance, Chromium. In this context, one of the main  issues that I had to solve is  how to build Chromium for MacOS in a reasonable time and avoiding to spend a lot of money in expensive bleeding edge Apple’s hardware to get CPU power.

This is what this post is about. This is an explanation about how to configure a Mac Pro to use a Linux based icecc cluster to boost the building times using cross-compilation. For simplicity, the explanation is focused in the singular case of just one single Linux host as icecc node and just one MacOS host requesting for compiling tasks but, in any case, you can extrapolate the instructions provided here to have many nodes as you need.

So let’s go with the the explanation but, first of all, a summary for those who want to go directly to the minimal and essential information …

TL;DR

On the Linux host:

# Configure the iceccd
$ sudo apt install icecc
$ sudo systemctl enable icecc-scheduler
$ edit /etc/icecc/icecc.conf
ICECC_MAX_JOBS="32"
ICECC_ALLOW_REMOTE="yes"
ICECC_SCHEDULER_HOST="192.168.1.10"
$ sudo systemctl restart icecc

# Generate the clang cross-compiling toolchain
$ sudo apt install build-essential icecc
$ git clone https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromium/tools/depot_tools.git ~/depot_tools
$ export PATH=$PATH:~/depot_tools
$ git clone https://github.com/psaavedra/chromium_clang_darwin_on_linux ~/chromium_clang_darwin_on_linux
$ cd ~/chromium_clang_darwin_on_linux
$ export CLANG_REVISION=332838  # or CLANG_REVISION=$(./get-chromium-clang-revision)
$ ./icecc-create-darwin-env
# copy the clang_darwin_on_linux_332838.tar.gz to your MacOS host

On the Mac:

# Configure the iceccd
$ git clone https://github.com/darktears/icecream-mac.git ~/icecream-mac/
$ sudo ~/icecream-mac/install.sh 192.168.1.10
$ launchctl load /Library/LaunchDaemons/org.icecream.iceccd.plist
$ launchctl start /Library/LaunchDaemons/org.icecream.iceccd.plist

# Set the ICECC env vars
$ export ICECC_CLANG_REMOTE_CPP=1
$ export ICECC_VERSION=x86_64:~/clang_darwin_on_linux_332838.tar.gz
$ export PATH=~/icecream-mac/bin/icecc/:$PATH

# Get the depot_tools
$ cd ~
$ git clone https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromium/tools/depot_tools.git
$ export PATH=$PATH:~/depot_tools

# Download and build the Chromium sources
$ cd chromium && fetch chromium && cd src
$ gn gen out/Default --args='cc_wrapper="icecc" \
  treat_warnings_as_errors=false \
  clang_use_chrome_plugins=false \
  use_debug_fission=false \
  linux_use_bundled_binutils=false \
  use_lld=false \
  use_jumbo_build=true'
$ ninja -j 32 -C out/Default chrome

… and now the detailed explanation

Installation and setup of icecream on Linux hosts

The installation of icecream on a  Debian based Linux host is pretty simple. The latest version (1.1) for icecc is available in Debian testing and sid for a while so everything that you must to do is install it from the APT repositories. For case of stretch, there is a backport available  in the apt.igalia.com repository publically available:

sudo apt install icecc

The second important part of a icecc cluster is the icecc-scheduler. This daemon is in charge to route the requests from the icecc nodes which requiring available CPUs  for compiling to the nodes of the icecc cluster allowed to run remote build jobs.

In this setup we will activate the scheduler in the Linux node (192.168.1.10). The key here is that only one scheduler should be up at the same time in the same network to avoid errors in the cluster.

sudo systemctl enable icecc-scheduler

Once the scheduler is configured and up, it is time to add icecc hosts to the cluster. We will start adding the Linux hosts following this idea:

  • The IP of the icecc scheduler is 192.168.1.10
  • The Linux host is allowed to run remote jobs
  • The Linux host is allowed to run up to 32 concurrent jobs (this is arbitrary decision and can be adjusted per each particular host)
    # edit /etc/icecc/icecc.conf
    ICECC_NICE_LEVEL="5"
    ICECC_LOG_FILE="/var/log/iceccd.log"
    ICECC_NETNAME=""
    ICECC_MAX_JOBS="32"
    ICECC_ALLOW_REMOTE="yes"
    ICECC_BASEDIR="/var/cache/icecc"
    ICECC_SCHEDULER_LOG_FILE="/var/log/icecc_scheduler.log"
    ICECC_SCHEDULER_HOST="192.168.1.10"

We will need to restart the service to apply those changes:

sudo systemctl restart icecc

Installing and setup of icecream on MacOS hosts

The next step is to install and configure the icecc service on our Mac.  The easy way to get icecc available on Mac is icecream-mac project from darktears. We will do the installation assuming the following facts:

  • The local user account in Mac is psaavedra
  • The IP of the icecc scheduler is 192.168.1.10
  • The Mac is not allowed to accept remote jobs
  • We don’t want run use the Mac as worker.

To get the icecream-mac software we will make a git-clone of the project on Github:

git clone https://github.com/darktears/icecream-mac.git /Users/psaavedra/icecream-mac/
sudo /Users/psaavedra/icecream-mac/install.sh 192.168.1.10

We will edit a bit the /Library/LaunchDaemons/org.icecream.iceccd.plist daemon definition as follows:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE plist PUBLIC "-//Apple Computer//DTD PLIST 1.0//EN" "http://www.apple.com/DTDs/PropertyList-1.0.dtd">
<plist version="1.0">
  <dict>
    <key>Label</key>
    <string>org.icecream.iceccd</string>
    <key>ProgramArguments</key>
    <array>
      <string>/Users/psaavedra/icecream-mac/bin/icecc/iceccd</string>
      <string>-s</string>
      <string>192.168.1.10</string>
      <string>-m</string>
      <string>2</string>
      <string>--no-remote</string>
    </array>
    <key>KeepAlive</key>
    <true/>
    <key>UserName</key>
    <string>root</string>
  </dict>
</plist>

Note that we are setting 2 workers in the Mac. Those workers are needed to execute threads in the host client host for things like linking … We will reload the service with this configuration:

launchctl load /Library/LaunchDaemons/org.icecream.iceccd.plist
launchctl start /Library/LaunchDaemons/org.icecream.iceccd.plist

Getting the cross-compilation toolchain for the icecream-mac

We already have the icecc cluster configured but, before to start to build Chromium on MacOS using icecc, there is still something before to do. We still need a cross-compiled clang for Darwin on Linux and, to avoid incompatibilities between versions, we need a clang based on the very same version that your Chromium code to be compiled.

You can check and get the cross-compilation clang revision that you need as follows:

cd src
CLANG_REVISION=$(cat tools/clang/scripts/update.py | grep CLANG_REVISION | head -n 1 | cut -d "'" -f 2)
echo $CLANG_REVISION
332838

In order to simplify this step.  I made some scripts which make it easy the generation of this clang cross-compiled toolchain. On a Linux host:

  • Install build depends:
    sudo apt install build-essential icecc
  • Get the Chromium project depot tools
    git clone https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromium/tools/depot_tools.git ~/depot_tools  
    export PATH=$PATH:~/depot_tools
  • Download the psaavedra’s scripts (yes, my scripts):
    git clone https://github.com/psaavedra/chromium_clang_darwin_on_linux ~/chromium_clang_darwin_on_linux
    cd ~/chromium_clang_darwin_on_linux
  • You can use the get-chromium-clang-revision script to get the latest clang revision using in Chromium master:
    ./get-chromium-clang-revision
  • and then, to build the cross-compiled toolchain:
    ./icecc-create-darwin-env

    ; this script encapsulates the download, configure and build of the clang software.

  • A clang_darwin_on_linux_999999.tar.gz file will be generated.

Setup the icecc environment variables

Once you have the /Users/psaavedra/clang_darwin_on_linux_332838.tar.gz generated in your MacOS. You are ready to set the icecc environments variables.

export ICECC_CLANG_REMOTE_CPP=1
export ICECC_VERSION=x86_64:/Users/psaavedra/clang_darwin_on_linux_332838.tar.gz

The first variable enables the usage of the remote clang for C++. The second one establish toolchain to use by the x86_64 (Linux nodes) to build the code sent from the Mac.

Finally, remember to add the icecc binaries to the $PATH:

export PATH=/Users/psaavedra/icecream-mac/bin/icecc/:$PATH

You can check and get the cross-compiled clang revision that you need as follows:

cd src
CLANG_REVISION=$(cat tools/clang/scripts/update.py | grep CLANG_REVISION | head -n 1 | cut -d "'" -f 2)
echo $CLANG_REVISION
332838

… and building Chromium, at last

Reached this point, it’s time to build a Chromium using the icecc cluster and the cross-compiled clang toolchain previously created. These steps follows the official Chromium build procedure and only adapted to setup the icecc wrapper.

Ensure depot_tools is the path:

cd ~git clone https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromium/tools/depot_tools.git
export PATH=$PATH:~/depot_tools
ninja --version
# 1.8.2

Get the code:

git config --global core.precomposeUnicode truemkdir chromium
cd chromium
fetch chromium

Configure the build:

cd src
gn gen out/Default --args='cc_wrapper="icecc" treat_warnings_as_errors=false clang_use_chrome_plugins=false linux_use_bundled_binutils=false use_jumbo_build=true'
# or with ccache
export CCACHE_PREFIX=icecc
gn gen out/Default --args='cc_wrapper="ccache" treat_warnings_as_errors=false clang_use_chrome_plugins=false linux_use_bundled_binutils=false use_jumbo_build=true'

And build, at last:

ninja -j 32 -C out/Default chrome

icemon allows you to graphically monitoring the icecc cluster. Run it in remote from your Linux host if you don’t want install it in the MacOS:

ssh -X user@yourlinuxbox icemon

; with icemon you should see how each build task is distributed across the icecc cluster.

by Pablo Saavedra at July 10, 2018 08:15 AM

July 09, 2018

Igalia Chromium

Frédéric Wang: Review of Igalia's Web Platform activities (H1 2018)

This is the semiyearly report to let people know a bit more about Igalia’s activities around the Web Platform, focusing on the activity of the first semester of year 2018.

Projects

Javascript

Igalia has proposed and developed the specification for BigInt, enabling math on arbitrary-sized integers in JavaScript. Igalia has been developing implementations in SpiderMonkey and JSC, where core patches have landed. Chrome and Node.js shipped implementations of BigInt, and the proposal is at Stage 3 in TC39.

Igalia is also continuing to develop several features for JavaScript classes, including class fields. We developed a prototype implementation of class fields in JSC. We have maintained Stage 3 in TC39 for our specification of class features, including static variants.

We also participated to WebAssembly (now at First Public Working Draft) and internationalization features for new features such as Intl.RelativeTimeFormat (currently at Stage 3).

Finally, we have written more tests for JS language features, performed maintenance and optimization and participated to other spec discussions at TC39. Among performance optimizations, we have contributed a significant optimization to Promise performance to V8.

Accessibility

Igalia has continued the standardization effort at the W3C. We are pleased to announce that the following milestones have been reached:

A new charter for the ARIA WG as well as drafts for ARIA 1.2 and Core Accessibility API Mappings 1.2 are in preparation and are expected to be published this summer.

On the development side, we implemented new ARIA features and fixed several bugs in WebKit and Gecko. We have refined platform-specific tools that are needed to automate accessibility Web Platform Tests (examine the accessibility tree, obtain information about accessible objects, listen for accessibility events, etc) and hope we will be able to integrate them in Web Platform Tests. Finally we continued maintenance of the Orca screen reader, in particular fixing some accessibility-event-flood issues in Caja and Nautilus that had significant impact on Orca users.

Web Platform Predictability

Thanks to support from Bloomberg, we were able to improve interoperability for various Editing/Selection use cases. For example when using backspace to delete text content just after a table (W3C issue) or deleting a list item inside a content cell.

We were also pleased to continue our collaboration with the AMP project. They provide us a list of bugs and enhancement requests (mostly for the WebKit iOS port) with concrete use cases and repro cases. We check the status and plans in WebKit, do debugging/analysis and of course actually submit patches to address the issues. That’s not always easy (e.g. when it is touching proprietary code or requires to find some specific reviewers) but at least we make discussions move forward. The topics are very diverse, it can be about MessageChannel API, CSSOM View, CSS transitions, CSS animations, iOS frame scrolling custom elements or navigating special links and many others.

In general, our projects are always a good opportunity to write new Web Platform Tests import them in WebKit/Chromium/Mozilla or improve the testing infrastructure. We have been able to work on tests for several specifications we work on.

CSS

Thanks to support from Bloomberg we’ve been pursuing our activities around CSS:

We also got more involved in the CSS Working Group, in particular participating to the face-to-face meeting in Berlin and will attend TPAC’s meeting in October.

WebKit

We have also continued improving the web platform implementation of some Linux ports of WebKit (namely GTK and WPE). A lot of this work was possible thanks to the financial support of Metrological.

Other activities

Preparation of Web Engines Hackfest 2018

Igalia has been organizing and hosting the Web Engines Hackfest since 2009, a three days event where Web Platform developers can meet, discuss and work together. We are still working on the list of invited, sponsors and talks but you can already save the date: It will happen from 1st to 3rd of October in A Coruña!

New Igalians

This semester, new developers have joined Igalia to pursue the Web platform effort:

  • Rob Buis, a Dutch developer currently living in Germany. He is a well-known member of the Chromium community and is currently helping on the web platform implementation in WebKit.

  • Qiuyi Zhang (Joyee), based in China is a prominent member of the Node.js community who is now also assisting our compilers team on V8 developments.

  • Dominik Infuer, an Austrian specialist in compilers and programming language implementation who is currently helping on our JSC effort.

Coding Experience Programs

Two students have started a coding experience program some weeks ago:

  • Oriol Brufau, a recent graduate in math from Spain who has been an active collaborator of the CSS Working Group and a contributor to the Mozilla project. He is working on the CSS Logical Properties and Values specification, implementing it in Chromium implementation.

  • Darshan Kadu, a computer science student from India, who contributed to GIMP and Blender. He is working on Web Platform Tests with focus on WebKit’s infrastructure and the GTK & WPE ports in particular.

Additionally, Caio Lima is continuing his coding experience in Igalia and is among other things working on implementing BigInt in JSC.

Conclusion

Thank you for reading this blog post and we look forward to more work on the web platform this semester!

July 09, 2018 10:00 PM