Planet Chromium

September 19, 2019

Google Chrome

Get more done with a little help from Google Chrome

New features in Google Chrome help you get more done

September 19, 2019 05:00 PM

Google Chrome Releases

Chrome Beta for Android Update

Hi everyone! We've just released Chrome Beta 78 (78.0.3904.18) for Android: it's now available on Google Play.

You can see a partial list of the changes in the Git log. For details on new features, check out the Chromium blog, and for details on web platform updates, check here.

If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Krishna Govind
Google Chrome

by Krishna Govind (noreply@blogger.com) at September 19, 2019 04:26 PM

Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to 77.0.3865.93 (Platform version: 12371.65.0) for most Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. Changes can be viewed here.


If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 vertical dots in the upper right corner of the browser).

Daniel Gagnon
Google Chrome OS

by Daniel Gagnon (noreply@blogger.com) at September 19, 2019 02:15 PM

Beta Channel Update for Desktop

The Chrome team is excited to announce the promotion of Chrome 78 to the beta channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. Chrome 78.0.3904.21 contains our usual under-the-hood performance and stability tweaks, but there are also some cool new features to explore - please head to the Chromium blog to learn more!


A full list of changes in this build is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels?  Find out how here. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues.



Srinivas Sista
Google Chrome

by Srinivas Sista (noreply@blogger.com) at September 19, 2019 11:55 AM

September 18, 2019

Google Chrome Releases

Chrome for Android Update

Hi, everyone! We've just released Chrome 77 (77.0.3865.92) for Android: it'll become available on Google Play over the next few weeks.

This release includes stability and performance improvements. You can see a full list of the changes in the Git log. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Ben Mason
Google Chrome

by Ben Mason (noreply@blogger.com) at September 18, 2019 05:00 PM

Chrome Beta for Android Update

Hi everyone! We've just released Chrome Beta 77 (77.0.3865.92) for Android: it's now available on Google Play.

You can see a partial list of the changes in the Git log. For details on new features, check out the Chromium blog, and for details on web platform updates, check here.

If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Ben Mason
Google Chrome

by Ben Mason (noreply@blogger.com) at September 18, 2019 02:30 PM

Beta Channel Update for Desktop

The beta channel has been updated to 77.0.3865.90 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.


A full list of changes in this build is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels?  Find out how here. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues.


Lakshmana Pamarthy
Google Chrome

by Lakshmana Pamarthy (noreply@blogger.com) at September 18, 2019 01:02 PM

Stable Channel Update for Desktop

The Stable channel has been updated to 77.0.3865.90 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. This will roll out over the coming days/weeks. A list of all changes is available in the log.



Security Fixes and Rewards
Note: Access to bug details and links may be kept restricted until a majority of users are updated with a fix. We will also retain restrictions if the bug exists in a third party library that other projects similarly depend on, but haven’t yet fixed.


This update includes 4 security fixes. Below, we highlight fixes that were contributed by external researchers. Please see the Chrome Security Page for more information.

[$TBD][1000934] Critical CVE-2019-13685: Use-after-free in UI. Reported by Khalil Zhani on 2019-09-05
[$20000][995964] High CVE-2019-13688: Use-after-free in media. Reported by Man Yue Mo of Semmle Security Research Team on 2019-08-20
[$20000][998548] High CVE-2019-13687: Use-after-free in media. Reported by Man Yue Mo of Semmle Security Research Team on 2019-08-28
[$TBD][1000002] High CVE-2019-13686: Use-after-free in offline pages. Reported by Brendon Tiszka on 2019-09-02


We would also like to thank all security researchers that worked with us during the development cycle to prevent security bugs from ever reaching the Stable channel.


Interested in switching release channels?  Find out how here. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues.


Lakshmana Pamarthy
Google Chrome

by Lakshmana Pamarthy (noreply@blogger.com) at September 18, 2019 11:23 AM

September 17, 2019

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel update for Desktop

The Dev channel has been updated to 78.0.3904.17 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.



A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues.
Srinivas Sista
Google Chrome

by Srinivas Sista (noreply@blogger.com) at September 17, 2019 02:22 PM

September 12, 2019

Google Chrome Releases

Stable Channel Update for Desktop

The Chrome team is delighted to announce the promotion of Chrome 77 to the Stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. This will roll out over the coming days/weeks.


Chrome 77.0.3865.75 contains a number of fixes and improvements -- a full list of changes in this build is available in the log. Watch out for upcoming Chrome and Chromium blog posts about new features and big efforts delivered in Chrome 77.

Security Fixes and Rewards
Note: Access to bug details and links may be kept restricted until a majority of users are updated with a fix. We will also retain restrictions if the bug exists in a third party library that other projects similarly depend on, but haven’t yet fixed.

This update includes 52 security fixes. Below, we highlight fixes that were contributed by external researchers. Please see the Chrome Security Page for more information.

[$TBD][999311] Critical CVE-2019-5870: Use-after-free in media. Reported by Guang Gong of Alpha Team, Qihoo 360 on 2019-08-29
[$7500][990570] High CVE-2019-5871: Heap overflow in Skia. Reported by Anonymous on 2019-08-03
[$3000][981492] High CVE-2019-5872: Use-after-free in Mojo. Reported by Zhe Jin(金哲),Luyao Liu(刘路遥) from Chengdu Security Response
Center of Qihoo 360 Technology Co. Ltd on 2019-07-05
[$3000][989497] High CVE-2019-5873: URL bar spoofing on iOS. Reported by Khalil Zhani on 2019-07-31
[$3000][989797] High CVE-2019-5874: External URIs may trigger other browsers. Reported by James Lee (@Windowsrcer) on 2019-08-01
[$2000][979443] High CVE-2019-5875: URL bar spoof via download redirect. Reported by Khalil Zhani on 2019-06-28
[$TBD][997190] High CVE-2019-5876: Use-after-free in media. Reported by Man Yue Mo of Semmle Security Research Team on 2019-08-23 
[$TBD][999310] High CVE-2019-5877: Out-of-bounds access in V8. Reported by Guang Gong of Alpha Team, Qihoo 360 on 2019-08-29
[$TBD][1000217] High CVE-2019-5878: Use-after-free in V8. Reported by Guang Gong of Alpha Team, Qihoo 360 on 2019-09-03
[$3000][986043] Medium CVE-2019-5879: Extensions can read some local files. Reported by Jinseo Kim on 2019-07-20
[$2000][831725] Medium CVE-2019-5880: SameSite cookie bypass. Reported by Jun Kokatsu (@shhnjk) on 2018-04-11
[$2000][980816] Medium CVE-2019-5881: Arbitrary read in SwiftShader. Reported by Zhe Jin(金哲),Luyao Liu(刘路遥) from Chengdu Security Response
Center of Qihoo 360 Technology Co. Ltd on 2019-07-03
[$1000][868846] Medium CVE-2019-13659: URL spoof. Reported by Lnyas Zhang on 2018-07-30
[$1000][882363] Medium CVE-2019-13660: Full screen notification overlap. Reported by Wenxu Wu (@ma7h1as) of Tencent Security Xuanwu Lab on 2018-09-10
[$1000][882812] Medium CVE-2019-13661: Full screen notification spoof. Reported by Wenxu Wu (@ma7h1as) of Tencent Security Xuanwu Lab on 2018-09-11
[$1000][967780] Medium CVE-2019-13662: CSP bypass. Reported by David Erceg on 2019-05-28
[$500][863661] Medium CVE-2019-13663: IDN spoof. Reported by Lnyas Zhang on 2018-07-14
[$500][915538] Medium CVE-2019-13664: CSRF bypass. Reported by thomas "zemnmez" shadwell on 2018-12-16
[$500][959640] Medium CVE-2019-13665: Multiple file download protection bypass. Reported by Jun Kokatsu, Microsoft Browser Vulnerability Research on 2019-05-05
[$500][960305] Medium CVE-2019-13666: Side channel using storage size estimate. Reported by Tom Van Goethem from imec-DistriNet, KU Leuven on 2019-05-07
[$500][973056] Medium CVE-2019-13667: URI bar spoof when using external app URIs. Reported by Khalil Zhani on 2019-06-11
[$500][986393] Medium CVE-2019-13668: Global window leak via console. Reported by David Erceg on 2019-07-22
[$N/A][968451] Medium CVE-2019-13669: HTTP authentication spoof. Reported by Khalil Zhani on 2019-05-30
[$N/A][980891] Medium CVE-2019-13670: V8 memory corruption in regex. Reported by Guang Gong of Alpha Team, Qihoo 360 on 2019-07-03
[$TBD][696454] Medium CVE-2019-13671: Dialog box fails to show origin. Reported by xisigr of Tencent's Xuanwu Lab on 2017-02-27
[$TBD][997925] Medium CVE-2019-13673: Cross-origin information leak using devtools. Reported by David Erceg on 2019-08-26
[$500][896533] Low CVE-2019-13674: IDN spoofing. Reported by Khalil Zhani on 2018-10-18
[$500][929578] Low CVE-2019-13675: Extensions can be disabled by trailing slash. Reported by Jun Kokatsu, Microsoft Browser Vulnerability Research on 2019-02-07
[$TBD][875178] Low CVE-2019-13676: Google URI shown for certificate warning. Reported by Wenxu Wu (@ma7h1as) of Tencent Security Xuanwu Lab on 2018-08-17
[$TBD][939108] Low CVE-2019-13677: Chrome web store origin needs to be isolated. Reported by Jun Kokatsu, Microsoft Browser Vulnerability Research on 2019-03-06
[$TBD][946633] Low CVE-2019-13678: Download dialog spoofing. Reported by Ronni Skansing on 2019-03-27
[$TBD][968914] Low CVE-2019-13679: User gesture needed for printing. Reported by Conrad Irwin, Superhuman on 2019-05-31
[$TBD][969684] Low CVE-2019-13680: IP address spoofing to servers. Reported by Thijs Alkemade from Computest on 2019-06-03
[$TBD][970378] Low CVE-2019-13681: Bypass on download restrictions. Reported by David Erceg on 2019-06-04
[$TBD][971917] Low CVE-2019-13682: Site isolation bypass. Reported by Jun Kokatsu, Microsoft Browser Vulnerability Research on 2019-06-07
[$TBD][987502] Low CVE-2019-13683: Exceptions leaked by devtools. Reported by David Erceg on 2019-07-25

We would also like to thank all security researchers that worked with us during the development cycle to prevent security bugs from ever reaching the stable channel.

As usual, our ongoing internal security work was responsible for a wide range of fixes:

  • [1002279] Various fixes from internal audits, fuzzing and other initiatives



Interested in switching release channels?  Find out how here. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues.


Lakshmana Pamarthy
Google Chrome

by Lakshmana Pamarthy (noreply@blogger.com) at September 12, 2019 04:24 PM

Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to 77.0.3865.77 (Platform version: 12371.56.0) for most Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. Changes can be viewed here.


If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 vertical dots in the upper right corner of the browser).

Daniel Gagnon
Google Chrome OS

by Daniel Gagnon (noreply@blogger.com) at September 12, 2019 10:28 AM

September 11, 2019

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel update for Desktop

The Dev channel has been updated to 78.0.3904.9 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.



A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues.
Srinivas Sista
Google Chrome

by Srinivas Sista (noreply@blogger.com) at September 11, 2019 02:14 PM

Chromium Blog

Experimenting with same-provider DNS-over-HTTPS upgrade

As part of  our long standing commitment to making the web safer to use, we will be conducting an experiment to validate our implementation of DNS-over-HTTPS (aka DoH) in Chrome 78. As the name implies, the idea is to bring the key security and privacy benefits of HTTPS to DNS, which is how your browser is able to determine which server is hosting a given website. For example, when connected on a public WiFi, DoH would prevent other WiFi users from seeing which websites you visit, as well as prevent potential spoofing or pharming attacks. This experiment will be done in collaboration with DNS providers who already support DoH, with the goal of improving our mutual users’ security and privacy by upgrading them to the DoH version of their current DNS service. With our approach, the DNS service used will not change, only the protocol will. As a result, existing content controls of your current DNS provider, including any existing protections for children, will remain active.

More concretely, the experiment in Chrome 78 will check if the user’s current DNS provider is among a list of DoH-compatible providers, and upgrade to the equivalent DoH service from the same provider. If the DNS provider isn’t in the list, Chrome will continue to operate as it does today. The providers included in the list were selected for their strong stance on privacy and security, as well as the readiness of their DoH services, and also agreed to participate in the experiment. The goals of this experiment are to validate our implementation and to evaluate the performance impact. 

Our experiment will run on all supported platforms (with the exception of Linux and iOS) for a fraction of Chrome users. On Android 9 and above, if the user has specified a DNS-over-TLS provider in the private DNS settings, Chrome may use the associated DoH provider, and will fallback to the system private DNS upon error.

By keeping the DNS provider as-is and only upgrading to the provider’s equivalent DoH service, the user experience would remain the same. For instance, malware protection or parental control features offered by the DNS provider will continue to work. If DoH fails, Chrome will revert to the provider’s regular DNS service. Opting-out of the experiment will be possible from Chrome 78 by disabling the flag at chrome://flags/#dns-over-https.


Most managed Chrome deployments are excluded from the experiment.  For enterprise and education customers, we invite administrators to read the upcoming release notes for details about DoH policies which will be published on our Chrome Enterprise blog.

With 35 years of history, DNS is used by multiple parties, and enables diverse use cases. In particular, we are aware of how DNS can play an important role in ISP-provided family-safe content filtering. So, we are and will continue to take an incremental approach where we respect any active user-facing features such as family-friendly filters, with steps informed by discussions involving key stakeholders, e.g. ISPs, DNS providers, and organizations with expertise in online safety. We will also take into account performance and reliability statistics sent by users who have agreed to help improve Chrome’s features and performance, as well as user feedback.

This experiment is the humble first step of a long collaborative journey to improve our users’ privacy, security, and safety. We can’t wait to see how DoH performs in the wild, and welcome your feedback!

Kenji Baheux, Chrome Product Manager

by Chromium Blog (noreply@blogger.com) at September 11, 2019 11:21 AM

September 10, 2019

Google Chrome Releases

Chrome for Android Update

Hi, everyone! We've just released Chrome 77 (77.0.3865.73) for Android: it'll become available on Google Play over the next few weeks.

This release includes stability and performance improvements. You can see a full list of the changes in the Git log. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Ben Mason
Google Chrome

by Ben Mason (noreply@blogger.com) at September 10, 2019 03:15 PM

Monica Dinculescu

Metronomes in JavaScript

img.plot { max-height: 400px !important; }

My job nowadays involves a lot of music and JavaScript. You know what musicians really care about? Paychecks (support your local musicians, go to concerts, don’t steal music from indie musicians). But also: keeping time.

Keeping time in JavaScript is kind of a joke, not just because time is a social construct (this is the Jenn Schiffer social engineering at work), but because it’s really easy to write code that blocks the timekeeper. Remember: JavaScript inherently only has one thread, which it uses for everything: painting your buttons, looping through arrays, mining bitcoin, scrolling. Everything. This means that most of the time, you write blocking code, but it only blocks for a little bit – 1ms here and there. And that’s ok! Visually you don’t notice that kind of latency, and let’s be honest: it takes like 400ms to download the scripts, what’s 1ms?

1ms starts getting in the way when it’s actually 5ms, or 40 ms, or when you’re trying to have a metronome run correctly. I made a typing delay experiment to see how much delay people could tolerate, and just for typing alone some people got really antsy around 200ms (shout out to the section of the population who thought they were heroes because they could tolerate infinity delay because of how bad ssh latency is. That’s not heroic, that’s Stockholm syndrome. Complain to your sys admins).

When I changed that to an audio delay experiment, musicians started complaining around 40ms. And that was just audio delay, not an actual metronome. Imagine that fucking with your audio too! So, keeping time is really important – but how do we actually do that in JavaScript?

In general, when we want to not block in JavaScript (and do better than setInterval, who is the friend you invite to a party but shows up like +/- 4h to it), we do one of two things: start writing async functions, or move code to a Worker (Surma has a great article about workers everyone should read). In particular, for audio things, there’s a third option: using the Web Audio clock – Chris Wilson has a great blog post about how to do your own audio scheduling which is an oldie but a goodie! (turns out not much changes in 4 years in the Web Audio spec world). Anyway, I wanted to compare these three approaches, and see how bad the latency was.

Play with the experiment

Me being me, I made a whole demo to test and compare these approaches. I built 3 kinds of metronomes:

  • a really bad one using setInterval on the main thread,
  • a less bad one using setInterval in a Worker,
  • the best one, that uses the Web Audio API to preschedule audio events, at the times you want (labelled “prescheduled” in the graphs). The audio events will happen precisely at the time they are scheduled, but if you want a callback to do some visual work on, that callback needs to be in a setTimeout, and will happen when it happens. This is why there are two lines for this metronome.

You can run them on your own in that Glitch, but if you only want the results, here they are.

Results

Setup

There are 3 metronomes, that each tick 20 times, and after each tick, a callback function is called. For the first 2 metronomes, in this callback you also make the audio tick (except for the Web Audio scheduler metronome, which makes the audio tick on its own time). The graphs below log the difference between the audioContext.currentTime of successive ticks.

🤔 The unrealistic case

This is when you’re literally doing 0 work in between the clock ticks. This is probably never going to happen in a real app unless it’s … just an actual metronome i guess. In this case, the difference between successive ticks looks ok for all metronomes – I mean, why wouldn’t it be? You’re not scrolling, you’re not doing any work, what’s there to block the ticks? There’s still a bit of variance between each ticks, but that’s because we know we can’t schedule anything (except for the Web Audio clock) to be exactly 0.5s away.

🤢 The awful case

Here we are doing 0.5 seconds of fake work on the main thread, after each tick. This is where things get really dodgy. Because that fake work is blocking, that means that all the metronome callbacks are kind of screwed, and their ticks are delayed by at least 0.5s. In the second metronome, even though we’re calling setInterval() in a Worker, it makes no difference because the work from the previous tick is blocking, so it automatically delays the next tick. In the Web Audio case, we can hear the ticks correctly (the green line), but the callback (which you would use to display things to the screen), is delayed for the same reason as the other metronomes. Friends don’t let friends do work on the main thread.

😰 The better, but still not great case

When we have a big chunk of blocking work, a good approach is to chunk it up in smaller work. There are several ways to do this. I split each 0.5s of work into smaller 5ms chunks, and then do each of them in a requestAnimationFrame. This is ok, but a bit wasteful (it makes your work take longer than necessary). A better approach is to use tasks (see this sample code from the proxx game), but the results weren’t going to be that different in this case, so I didn’t bother. Anyway, this experiment looks better! Now our ticks are only delayed by about 5ms, which might be ok for your use case. The bad main thread setInterval metronome is still doing poorly because there’s still work on the main thread and it keeps time on the main thread, so time is still wibbly wobbly in this case.

🤩 The optimal case

All workers all the time! If you can, do all this expensive work in a Worker! If we move the work we have to do in the callback completely off the main thread, then this setup basically looks the same as the unrealistic “there’s no work being done ever” case – the key distinction is that it’s really “there’s no work being done on the main thread ever. Hurray!

What have I learned from this

  • time is hard
  • I knew setInterval() is bad for time keeping, but now I know it’s like … really bad
  • if you need audio scheduling, use the Web Audio clock
  • if you need accurate scheduling without the Web Audio clock, use setInterval in a Worker
  • and if you can, move any expensive work that you have to do from the main thread to a Worker.

Hope this helps at least one of you!


Thanks to Surma for proof reading this and letting me steal his horrific “block for a fixed time” sample code (it’s this. I know you want to look).

September 10, 2019 12:00 AM

September 09, 2019

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update for Desktop

The beta channel has been updated to 77.0.3865.75 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.


A full list of changes in this build is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels?  Find out how here. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues.


Lakshmana Pamarthy
Google Chrome

by Lakshmana Pamarthy (noreply@blogger.com) at September 09, 2019 04:00 PM

September 06, 2019

Google Chrome Releases

Beta Channel Update for Desktop

The beta channel has been updated to 77.0.3865.70 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.


A full list of changes in this build is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels?  Find out how here. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues.


Lakshmana Pamarthy
Google Chrome

by Lakshmana Pamarthy (noreply@blogger.com) at September 06, 2019 01:30 PM

September 05, 2019

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel update for Desktop

The Dev channel has been updated to 78.0.3902.4 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.



A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues.
Srinivas Sista
Google Chrome

by Srinivas Sista (noreply@blogger.com) at September 05, 2019 02:46 PM

Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Dev channel has been updated to 78.0.3900.0 (Platform version: 12479.0.0) for most Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 vertical dots in the upper right corner of the browser).

Bernie Thompson

Google Chrome

by Bernie Thompson (noreply@blogger.com) at September 05, 2019 02:39 PM

September 04, 2019

Google Chrome Releases

Chrome Beta for Android Update

Hi everyone! We've just released Chrome Beta 77 (77.0.3865.66) for Android: it's now available on Google Play.

You can see a partial list of the changes in the Git log. For details on new features, check out the Chromium blog, and for details on web platform updates, check here.

If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Ben Mason
Google Chrome

by Ben Mason (noreply@blogger.com) at September 04, 2019 05:51 PM

Beta Channel Update for Desktop

The beta channel has been updated to 77.0.3865.65 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.


A full list of changes in this build is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels?  Find out how here. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues.


Lakshmana Pamarthy
Google Chrome

by Lakshmana Pamarthy (noreply@blogger.com) at September 04, 2019 03:30 PM

Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to 77.0.3865.63 (Platform version: 12371.46.0) for most Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. Changes can be viewed here.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 vertical dots in the upper right corner of the browser).

Daniel Gagnon
Google Chrome OS

by Daniel Gagnon (noreply@blogger.com) at September 04, 2019 01:59 PM

August 31, 2019

Google Chrome Releases

Chrome Beta for Android Update

Hi everyone! We've just released Chrome Beta 77 (77.0.3865.56) for Android: it's now available on Google Play.

You can see a partial list of the changes in the Git log. For details on new features, check out the Chromium blog, and for details on web platform updates, check here.

If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Ben Mason
Google Chrome

by Ben Mason (noreply@blogger.com) at August 31, 2019 06:23 AM

August 30, 2019

Google Chrome Releases

Dev Channel update for Desktop

The Dev channel has been updated to 78.0.3895.5 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.



A partial list of changes is available in the log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues.
Srinivas Sista
Google Chrome

by Srinivas Sista (noreply@blogger.com) at August 30, 2019 02:02 PM

Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to 77.0.3865.56 (Platform version: 12371.41.0) for most Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements. Changes can be viewed here.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our forum or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 vertical dots in the upper right corner of the browser).

Daniel Gagnon
Google Chrome OS

by Daniel Gagnon (noreply@blogger.com) at August 30, 2019 11:21 AM